Electrical outlet testing

Is there a way to test a single gang outlet not connected to a circuit?
I had an issue with power loss from two outlets and a small room this morning. The breaker is not the issue since other outlets on the same circuit are live. I followed the run trying to find a break somewhere. From the panel, the run Ts off. To the left, all outlets function. To the right, it passes a junction box, then to an outlet, which is fine. From that outlet it runs to another outlet, which is dead and from there, the rest of the circuit is dead. Testing the outlet while connected displayed 1.2 volts as did the other outlets after that. After disconnecting the outlet and checking the feed wire, it puts out 120 volts. Therefore, the obvious answer is the outlet, right? But checking the outlet off the circuit, indicates proper continuity with the two side connections (screws) respectively, as well as the prong slot with the screws. I know continuity isn't always a thorough test, but in this case, it appears logical to have in order for power to pass. Therefore, arriving to that question if it can be tested off the circuit.
Thank you
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meanie wrote:

If that is the case, just shot gun it by replacing the outlet with a new one.(The re not that expensive)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Screw the wires on, not back stab them.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
Hi, If that is the case, just shot gun it by replacing the outlet with a new one.(The re not that expensive)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hmm. Well, even a stopped clock is right, twice a day (analog only). The one I fixed which wasn't sending power down stream, that was also back stabbed.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Meanie;2970774 Wrote: > "Stormin Mormon" cayoung61*** snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in message

> screws. I'm willing to bet dollars to donuts that's where the problem was right there.
I wouldn't even bother buying a new receptacle. I'd put the wires on the screw terminals, and that should fix the problem. Those back stab terminals have been nothing but problems since they came out with the stupid things.
Use the screw terminals instead, even thought they take a few minutes, and avoid hours of frustration trying to locate the wiring problems associated with back stabbed connections.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There's too much variability in the quality of back-stab outlets in my view. I've had problems with them too. But, I do like the type that takes the straight wire and then clamps it tight via a screw. Bending the wire and getting it just right around the screw is what takes the time.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I also like the back clamp type. I've used them more than once.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
There's too much variability in the quality of back-stab outlets in my view. I've had problems with them too. But, I do like the type that takes the straight wire and then clamps it tight via a screw. Bending the wire and getting it just right around the screw is what takes the time.
Tomsic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.-. wrote:

I like them too. I think they are called "back wired" outlets, and that's what I always look for even though they may cost a little more than some of the other outlets on the shelf.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$.69 (or is that $.39) specials are a waste of time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. I use the outlets and switches that clamp onto the wire. Backstabs should be banned (they're only 14ga anyway) and twisting the wire around the screw takes too much time and effort. The back clamps are a great compromise. The outlets that don't have the clamps seem to be the $.69 specials.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd be sticking to checking voltage rather than continuity, and do so with a load on the circuit. Testing voltages with no load can mislead you.
If you have a dead outlet after a good outlet, it could be a bad connection at the good outlet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ditto on having a load connected. I would have a light bulb at the first dead outlet as well as one at the last powered outlet. Or a radio at the first dead outlet if it is not visible from the last live outlet. Assuming the wire irself is ok, there are only 2 places to look, at the last live outlet and the first dead outlet.
BUT! Are you absolutely sure there is no junction box between the last live outlet and the first dead outlet. I recently found in a situation exactly like yours that there was a junction box between a live outlet and a dead one. Illegal to have a box without visible access, but these things happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
news:17a3dc84-b76b-41af-88df->

Yes, I'm sure. All wires are exposed and running along the joists of my basement, which is currently bare as I prep for the installation of a drop ceiling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, I've seen this when the outlets are backstabbed.
The HO kept telling me "it can't be a problem with this socket, cause it works....." and took some Jedi Knight powers to get that outlet taken apart.
If you need a visual, plug four extension cords, one into the next, in the form of a mule train. One into the other. Remove plug 3 from cord socket 2. And then ask the customer why sockets 3 and 4 don't work. Every time he tries to plug plug 3 into cord 2, tell him not to. Look! (plugs tester into cord 2) this can't be the problem because the socket #2 still works!
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
If you have a dead outlet after a good outlet, it could be a bad connection at the good outlet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

- but very often.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

- but very often.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

First draft of my post contained the word "usually," but I deleted it before I posted, because I figured someone would complain about that! Hard to win on usenet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a couple days.of use of the new one. It sounds like it's good. It's amazing how confusing testing can be.
When I was about 30, a church pastor in Brooklyn hired me as a handyman to fix they're wiring. Old beautiful church, maybe from 1890. Bulky church with cement walls in the hall and wood paneling in the study. Had to run a wire outside the cement to the ceiling fixture, and boy were there lots of wires behind the baseboard outlet. It all worked when I left, but I have doubts how long it lasted. Of course I hadn't charged much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.