electrical ground rod

Anyone know the fastest/easiest way to install these 8' rods? It's a pain in the ass pounding them 3/4 of the way down, hitting a rock or other and then pulling it back out. Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are a PITA.
Last time I did it "right", I used a fence post driver (a capped section of pipe with handles) to start it and get the rod 6' under. At that point, the fence post driver hits the ground. After that it just used a good sized sledge hammer.
In my case, the rod would seem to "lock up" and I would not see any measurable progress after several blows. But eventually I got it down (and actually below ground level. You might consider putting on the ground clamp before you start with the hammer. After a zillion blows, the head might mushroom a little.
There ain't no easy road!
I suspect that I hit down rocks on the way down and the rocks had to shift or break up before I could progress. If you have a big enough rock formation down below you are SOL and will have to used some other "approved" method like putting the rod in lengthwise.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are lucky. Only the first 1-2 feet were easy for me :(

I had the same experience. First 1-2 feet were easy. For a while, I kept pulling back and starting again... Then, I realized that persistence worked... each blow of my 3 pound sledgehammer moved the rod almost imperceptably. But after a good workout of about 30 minutes, I finally go the rod all the way down to the last inch or two.

How true! I learned the hard way and had to use my grinder to shave off the mushroom.

Yup...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Believe it or not, I used a 20# hammer. I didn't swing it over my head like I was driving railroad spikes but only let it drop about 8" to 12" or so (about the same as the effective drop of a small hammer. When I only used a 3# hammer to a good approximation absolutely NOTHING happened!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A & P D wrote:

A larger hammer drill, or more properly rotary hammer with a ground rod drive adapter. Hilti is best.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wet the ground first?
I only did this once, and although there were all kinds of rocks when I tried to plant a tree, 8 inches from the foundation, I iddn't find many obstacles.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I used a t-post driver 'till it was against the ground. Then finished them off with a sledge. Code allows them to be in at a 45 degree angle if rock is encountered that you can't get through.
--
Steve Barker



"A & P D" < snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Reference only codes, this post is from my memory, and can be flawed. ;)
3/4 down is 6', if you have rocky soil, then the code allows for you to drive the rod at an angle, up to 45 degrees. That might be enough to get your rod completely flush with the ground.
Tips:
1. Put your Acorn Clamp on first. 2. Drive the rod after it rained hard. 3. If all else fails, you are allowed to dig down two feet and lay the rod in.
You have options, check your codes.
later,
tom @ www.BlankHelp.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.