Electrical contact grease?

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On 1/23/2014 8:26 PM, gregz wrote:

Don't know about that; I thought the point of "conductive" grease _was_ the conductivity. But the spacing between conductors ain't all that much in some of these connectors. I'd not take the chance meself.
But, I've not had any use for any and so don't know actual datasheet spec's...
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On Friday, January 24, 2014 9:18:04 AM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

+1
It would seem to me if you had a grease type compound that was conductive, the smaller the distance, the worse the problem. If I have two conductors 1/16" away from each other it's going to be easier for the conductive stuff to connect them than if they were 1" apart. I would think you'd only use the conductive stuff where there is good separation and you can keep the stuff where it needs to be. With many auto type connectors, you can't do that.
I wound up cleaing the connector with electrical contact cleaner, then working the connector on/off a dozen times, then applying dielectric grease. It's working fine as of now.....
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On 1/24/2014 9:00 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I'd never previously actually looked at the datasheet for Stabilant--
The Stabilant isn't actually a conductive grease of which one normally thinks; it's as Gregz says above a dilute solution in a carrier of a polymer and it has very unusual properties in that it is only conductive under an applied field if I read their (limited) top-level stuff correctly.
I was thinking (and writing) of an actual bulk grease that is electrically conductive such as Conducto-Lube or the like that are full of Ag or C or other various other conductive materials depending on the target application and serve also as the water displacement that the Si lubes do for plug boots, electrical connectors and the like. But, these latter non-conductive greases don't actually help the connection, it relies on physical contact to locally displace them for the actual electrical contact but they remain in the overall connector to keep out dirt, moisture, etc.
But, while Stabilant would serve well for the connection, it's price overkill for automotive connectors so I was pretty much discounting its actual use for your purposes, simply cautioning against slopping a bunch of a conductive paste grease in there thinking one would want it to be conductive but not thinking about having both polarities in the same connector before doing same.
Perhaps that clarifies the difference some and covers both ends of the spectrum...
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Volkswagon dealers and NAPA used to carry Stabilant. A long time ago, called Tweek, by audio company.
I'm not sure if i ever measured my cramolin copper loaded grease. I think it might be best for static elimination. A long time ago something about railroad tracks was mentioned, can't remember where or who.
Greg
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On 1/24/2014 8:18 AM, dpb wrote:

"Stabilant 22 is an initially non-conductive block polymer that when used in a thin film within contacts switches to a conductive state under the effect of the electrical field. The field gradient at which this occurs is set such that the material will remain non-conductive between adjacent contacts in a multiple pin connector environment."
It is now also available diluted with alcohol.
I make no claims about effectiveness of the stuff.
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On 1/24/2014 9:31 AM, bud-- wrote: ...

See my above amplification -- it's entirely different animuhl than of which I was cautioning.
--


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conductivity" of connections and "stabilized" the connection.
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On 1/24/2014 5:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, yes, as the followup says it's a very odd piece o' work and isn't a bulk grease at all and has the unusual property that appears only conductive w/ applied load.
As said in that follow-up that's a completely different piece o' work than what was cautioning against...
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On Thursday, January 23, 2014 3:13:55 PM UTC-5, Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Thanks, Brass Rat 78 here

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On Wednesday, January 22, 2014 4:56:24 PM UTC-5, Fred McKenzie wrote:

Or it could be neither, just the point where the connector mates. Put some dielectric grease on it and it's working.
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On Monday, January 20, 2014 10:08:42 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Deoxit to clean it - spray on; make/break contacts a few times to clean off . Let dry then apply dielectric grease (available in tubes at your local a uto parts store in the same section as the RTV etc. - sometimes called "tun eup grease" as it is often used in spark plug boots to keep them from stick ing to the porcelain) and reconnect. Drive happy for another 10 years or s o.
good luck
nate
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I actually have cramolin copper grease. Other than that, grease does not conduct and can cause problems with low pressure. I've seen silicon grease supplied with lamp kits before. Nor a grease, tweek, or stabilant 22 is supposed to conduct. Is a light oily substance.
I've seen a lot of problems with cheap halogen lamp connections. Crimps often fail on those cheap units.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

After reading all the responses so far, it seems that since no one has mentioned it yet, there must be something that WD-40 cannot fix? :-)
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Bill
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On Tuesday, January 21, 2014 8:19:50 AM UTC-5, willshak wrote:

WD-40 would work OK as a cleaner if you don't have any Deoxit, but Deoxit (or "tuner cleaner") is far preferable.
nate
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On 1/21/2014 8:37 AM, N8N wrote:

You know, I'm also surprised no one mentioned WD.
A friend of mine really likes Caig Deoxit, for corroded terminal cleaning.
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Christopher A. Young
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There is not too much stuff that actually cleans. Most of the cleaning is by rubbing. An oil or alcohol will help move the grime around. Deoxit is pretty good stuff to have around. So is CRC 2-26 .
Two things that can clean are acids like Tarn-X or olive oil. The oleic acid in olive oil, or plain oleic acid eats corrosion. Needs to be flushed after cleaning.
Greg
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Deoxit is only a 5% solution. For better results, the red 100 % solution, I would recommend. It's not a spray. More oily, and but not good for certain environments That could collect dust.
Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I've had a brush top can of Thomas and Betts Kopr-Shield grease for probably 30 years now and always paint a bit of it it on automotive bulb and connector contacts when changing out things.
Works for me:
http://www.tnb.com/ps/fulltilt/index.cgi?part 131879
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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