Electrical conduit.

I am finishing my basement. This will include some wiring. Are the three kinds of conduit (PVC, standard metal and thin metal) considered to be interchangeable? I am using 2" foamboard onto poured concrete covered by 1/2" drywall. The conduit will be attached to the concrete before the foamboard is installed.
Peter.
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they are interchangable in your application, inside,dry and protected behind wallboard-you can use any of the three Todd
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Many thanks.
Peter.

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Inside a wall you do not have to run conduit. Romex will meet the code. Even with conduit you will have to put metal straps in the furring strips that you install to hold the wall board. To prevent nails/screws from going into the conduit.
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Depends on where he lives.
Romex will _usually_ be sufficient, but not in Chicago for instance.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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<< Are the three kinds of conduit (PVC, standard metal and thin metal) considered to be interchangeable? >>
Only to the degree permitted by your building codes. Call and ask if you have any doubts. Keep in mind the property differences of the materials, like PVC doesn't corrode, EMT doesn't melt at temperatures over 100 C, rigid conduit may be overkill for your application, etc. HTH
Joe
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The use of PVC inside walls is basically illegal. You are NOT suppose to use it inside for 2 reasons. 1 is that wires can get hot, hot wires inside a plastic conduit sounds like a good way to kill yourself from fumes if there is a fire (caused by electric)
Its only used OUTSIDE and underground. (PVC = No Rust)
Metal conduit would just be too much of pain in the ass for in walls installation. Romex would be the cheapest route but just remember to follow romex guidelines. (it can be left exposed ONLY on the ceiling)
BX cable might be a better choice for you. Its a pain to work with (actually I prefer it to romex) but it shielded and can be run just about anywhere.
If you decide to use conduit, just remember that you are NOT suppose to run romex or bx THROUGH conduit. This IS against the NEC code! (also a waste of space) You run single wires through it. (thats why PVC is NOT good for inside work)
Tom
PVR wrote:

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wrote:

Either it is, or it isn't, "basicly" is not a real qualifier.
So I went looking for PVC, couldn't find it in the US's 2002NEC; so, I'm guessing you mean RNC(Rigid Nonmetalic Conduit Article 352). Section 352.10(A), RNC is permited to be conceiled in walls, floors, and ceilings. So per the NEC, it is ok to stick inside walls.

The most conductor insulations are plastic.

If there is a fire, generally there is smoke.

Couldn't find romex guidlines in the NEC, did find nonmetalic sheath(NM) cable. Only under certain conditions, like locations: UNfinished basements, and attics. Sec. 334.15, and special precautions need to be followed,

If you are enclosing the walls, I would stick with NM, and properly follow the code. If not, then move up to Metal Clad(MC), I just feel safer knowing I have an actual grounding conductor. Yeah, I know the cable jacket becomes grounded with proper installation, but having that seperate conductor will help you sleep better at night. ;)

I agree with waste, but mostly money. As for running cable, I know everyone say don't do it, but it's debate on why? Personally the increased costs and double jacketing it, is a turn-off, but where in the code does it say you can't? Thank you.

Hi Peter, if you can't maintain a 1-1/4" seperation from the outside edge of the studs and your cable, you will need to come up with protecting the runs. If you go with thicker walls, like with 2x4's, you should have no problem with finishing the basement wiring like normal house wiring.
btw, always only allow qualified personnel to only do work on your house.
hth,
tom @ www.URLBee.com
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They are not really interchangable. Each has it's most appropriate use but they will all work in most residential applications. The easiest one for a homeowner is grey PVC (rigid non-metalic conduit). It is good above ground, below ground, inside and outside. It won't put up with a lot of physical damage but it is pretty tough. Ther next step is EMT (thinwall). It is a little tougher than plastic, can act as the grounding, although most people still pull in a ground wire, but it does require more to install. You should have a bender and some practice. EMT does give you a more professional looking install when you get the bends right. Rigid Metal (threaded) is really for heavy duty use and you usually see it in industrial settings. It is pretty hard to install if you don't have the tools to thread pipe and a hydraulic bender.
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