Electric Weed Eater spinning too fast


It's a RT112C. I don't recommend this model, by the way, for several reasons. Anyway...
Apparently it's designed to spin very fast. You would think that's good, but it's not. It causes the line to break off very frequently, almost as soon as the spinning line touches anything, so you end up spending most of your time feeding out line.
So what I've done is power the thing through a 3-amp variac, or auto-transformer, which allows me to adjust the AC voltage level the Weed Eater sees. This works fine, and I can now set the speed so that it cuts well but doesn't break off very often.
But this arrangement is a bit cumbersome - I have to set it up in the front, then move it all to the back - and I'd like to figure out a simpler solution. Well, I guess I can put a resistor in series, but I don't know what value or rating. Or maybe a coil?
Well, I just thought maybe someone else had solved this problem and could give me a suggestion.
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Heh heh....
I had a Craftsman weed eater that was designed to whack of the plastic part that held the blade intended to cut new line to proper length. It did this as designed and eventually trashed the tool altogether. I returned it under warranty and got a new one, which true to form, trashed itself again.

Do like I did. Buy a better weed eater.
nb
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On 7/6/2010 6:46 PM, Peabody wrote:

Mine is a similar model and string does break far too often. I use it close to house but have a gasoline unit for rougher areas out back and intend to use the more robust string that it uses in my electric unit when it runs out of string. Feed hole is big enough and heavier string should not be a problem to feed.
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I wonder if a incandescent lamp dimmer(triac dimmer) would work to slow the motor down? I use one as a speed controller on my Dremel model 270 Moto-tool. 3 amps would be within the dimmer's capability.You could build one into a box inline with the trimmer's power cord,near the handle,or into a box with an outlet for the trimmer's power cord to plug into,and then plug into an extension cord.
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Jim Yanik
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Peabody wrote:

On my old electric Toro I never held the trigger on full. I just jab it to get the speed I want. Who in their right mind would run these a full bore? I did have to change the micro switch once,, 29 cents I think. My new Homelite gas job has a throttle. Much better.
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LSMFT

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The thinner gauge line of some electrics is the cause not speed.
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You could build a triac circuit in the handle somewhere. They are pretty simple. You can't use a coil or resistor because they would need to be rather large to drop any voltage at that current. And would also need to be cooled.
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<...snipped...>
<...snipped...>
If you don't mind experimenting, you might try a dimmer. It might be small enough to actually mount in the handle somewhere. The trimmer most likely uses a series wound motor so it should work.
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There are no stupid questions, but there are lots of stupid answers.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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