Electric Wall Oven heating higher than dial


I have an older electric wall oven that when you set the temperature on the dial, the oven will actually heat to a higher temperature. It is very frustrating (I've burned a few dishes already). Any suggestions?
Also, the knob broke off the "Bake, Broil, etc..." dial and I have no idea where to find a replacement.
Thanks!
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I'd get rid of that oven, post haste! Mine burnt the inside wall when I noticed it and needed immediate removal. I got it out really fast for someone with no knowledge.
Betsy
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First, check that the ventilation pathway is open and clean. May be as simple as that. If you take a cooking thermometer, you could also see if there's a consistent offset and simply adjust your settings appropriately. Do that w/ 50+ yr old "emergency-use" gas range here as the occasional use of this makes it unprofitable to spend anything on it...if it were primary oven, that would be different.
Second, could be it needs a new thermocouple. Depending on the age and make/model, it may or may not be worth working on. Online places have parts for almost anything even remotely common 20 years of age and newer. If it's only the knob and not the shaft that's broken, good chance of finding an replacement. For it, if can't find the exact one online, take the one you have to a "full-service" appliance outlet/service place and they can almost certainly find one that will serve the purpose.
While I can't recall exact names or find a bookmark at the moment, I've had good luck w/ two -- one was in Oklahoma City, the other in Louisville, iirc. I'm sure there are many others. You find your range model and serial number, go online to one of these sites and put it in and it will give you list of any/all parts available.
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wrote:

Depends. Check with an oven thermometer to see if it's just consistantly holding a different temperature than indicated. If that's the case, glue a white label around the nob and mark the true temperatures with a pen.
If it's NOT consistant about it, then there's something wrong with the thermostat, and you'll probably have to start replacing parts.

Many home appliances come with a label on them somewhere, telling you useful things like, who made them, and what model they are. If yours had a label like that, you could look it up on the internet. Since it obviously didn't or you'd have mentioned it in the course of asking for help fixing it, I suppose you'll have to make a new nob out of Bondo.
--Goedjn
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You left out the details. How long should the Bondo be left to dry? Can it be used as is, or should it be given a coat of primer? Is it OK to hand fuzzy dice from it?
Damn, I hate it when we only get half the story.
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Or PC-70. Also very good. I'm assuming the shaft has a flat side or flutes, and doesnt' depend on a set screw in the knob to fix it to the shaft.
Also, try an old tv store for knobs.
I found a beautiful big eletric rotisserie in a dumpster once. The rest of it was full of building materials removed from some renovation. But this was almost as clean as new, as clean as anyone can get cooking stuff after it's been hot with food. I didn't know how good rotisserie food can be. It was complete with trays and grills and everything except knobs, that I got from my stash of tv knobs.
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Wood Crow wrote:

If it is old and uses a rotary dial to set the temperature then the dial itself will often have a "calibration" feature built into it. This usually takes the form of a couple of tiny screws on the back of the knob (pull it straight off of the shaft) that allows you to rotate the apron of the knob relative to the shaft. Place an accurate oven thermometer in the oven, set the oven to 300-degrees (or some other convenient temperature), determine what the difference between real and set temperatures is, and then adjust the knob to match.
As for parts, I've had great luck with http://www.repairclinic.com/0070.asp
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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