Electric vs. Gas, your opinion ?????

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What about the loss of energy when transmitting through electrical cables? Vs. gas which I don't believe looses mcuh energy in its transmission?
-- Thank you,
I once went on a tour of a natural gas pumping station. The gas pressure in the pipeline varied during the year, between 500 PSI and 2000 PSI. I was told the pumping station, which used a big natural gas fired engine to run compressors to do the pumping, used 11% of the gas it pumped. So much for cheap transmission costs.
Stretch
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Nuclear is not high cost, nor is it rising particularly fast, certainly nowhere near the increase we have seen in oil and natural gas the last couple years. The overall cost of nuclear is about the same as coal.
Here in NJ, the owners of Oyster Creek are desperately trying to get that nuke relicensed for another 20 years because it is a very cost effective way of generating electricity. That is also why France gets over half of it's electricity from nuclear power.
As for changing to electric for a range and heat, in most of the country, that would be foolish. Electric heat is generally the most expensive way of heating. As for a range, the amount of energy difference is not going to make that big of a difference to make it worthwhile. I'd be very surprised if electric was cheaper than gas. Personally, I prefer a gas range and an electric oven for the way they perform, not the price.

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On 10 Mar 2006 06:40:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

They say that a third of the nuclear power generated in this country uses radioactive fuels that come from disassembling Soviet bombs. I find this whole notion and the percentage amazing.
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Nuclear MUST at some point pay the cost for old fuel disposal. this legacy cost and the cost to rebuild existing nuclear plants which are nearing the end of their design life.plus coal fired plants and the environmental controls needed
all of this and the increasing cost of gas and oil is going to drive electric csts skyward
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The cost for DECOMMISSIONING a nuke is built-into the utility's rates. This cost was originally determined when the unit was built.
I suspect, however, they gave little thought to spent fuel disposal. So far, most of it still resides at the station - at the bottom of a tank of boron.
It will "soon" be transported to Yucca Mountain for <ahem> permanent disposal (storage).
http://www.ocrwm.doe.gov/ymp/index.shtml

Agreed. I wish we could build more nukes. <sigh>
--
:)
JR

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They already are paying the costs for disposal. All owners of nuclear plants are now paying hundreds of millions into a govt fund that is going to pay for the Yucca Flat disposal site.

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

But Joseph, I've already been doing that. I would hate to think how much higher my last bill ($275) would have been had I not conserved. I even have the programmable thermostat. Considering gas has already doubled in cost and electric has slightly increased, what do you think next year will be like ?
J
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Joey wrote:

Bad..
Electric vs gas prices vary greatly around the world and within different countries. I did not check the facts locally, but I believe they both went up about an equal % this year. The difference is the electric went much as predicted the gas went up less than predicted. Your mileage may vary.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Joey wrote:

Perhaps consider an alternative heating method. For example several years ago I had a wood burning fireplace insert installed. Using a programmable thermostat my gas fired hot air heating system assures that the house never goes below a defined comfortable temperature. When I get home from work a few logs will quickly boost the interior temp to comfy levels. Then at bedtime adding a few logs and setting the damper provides sufficient heating to where the furnace doesn't kick in until morning. Many times enough heat to last well into the morning.
Of course a side benefit is not being locked into a single fuel heating source.
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-snip-
Joey- If you're in SW Georgia, and you're not living in some 1/2 acre house, then you've got some more conserving to do.
I live in a 100+ yr old 3BR farmhouse in upstate NY & my utilities only run about $300 a month. I have an oil furnace, a propane space heater, stove, dryer & water heater. We keep the house at 70 during the day- set back to 65 at night.
Our electricity has gone from 12 to 16cents a KWh. Oil from $1.99 to $2.40, and LP from $2.20 to $2.45. [hardly doubled-- but the media is still screaming about soaring utility costs---- we've had such a mild winter my costs are just about where they were last year at this time.]
Note that my electric has gone up the most-- and it has done that in the past 2 months as my gas & oil have been going down.
The only way to figure out if switching would be feasible-- at current rates- is to have your suppliers run the numbers. And there are no guarantees that next year won't be just the opposite.
What are you paying for gas and electricity per unit?
Jim
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In another message about heat pumps, I spoke of the importance of improving the thermal performance of your home. Insulation and air sealing are perhaps your best protection against rising energy costs and, as an added bonus, both can help make your home more comfortable.
Some improvements, such as replacing windows and doors or the installation of a new heating system are difficult to justify unless these products are nearing the end of their useful life or their performance is so woefully deficient that an early change out makes sense. Other measures, such as caulking and weather stripping, plastic window kits, low flow shower heads or additional attic insulation can be done at modest cost and typically by the homeowner himself. A no cost option with a big payback: washing laundry in cold water.
Through a whole series of upgrades (including new windows and doors and new heating system), I reduced my home's energy consumption by over eighty per cent. In some cases, the economic payback couldn't be justified based on the energy savings alone, but there were other good reasons to go ahead and do the work. Sometimes, it was the simple satisfaction of eliminating waste and inefficiency wherever they may be, and knowing that each of us can make a positive impact, no matter how small. Whatever the motivator, there are any number of steps you can take to control of your energy costs.
And for those contemplating a switchover from gas to electric, how about using portable electric heaters to offset some of your gas consumption? This eliminates the risk and expense of replacing your existing gas furnance and provides you with the flexibility of easily switching fuels based on their current price. Oil filled electric heaters are relatively inexpensive and probably the safest to use. Then, after one or two power bills, you'll be in a better position to decide if electric heat is truly the smarter choice.
Cheers, Paul
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I installed a dual fuel oven with my remodel. Gas burners on top, electric convection oven, best of both worlds.
Real nice unit, much more efficient than the old one, hardly gets hot on the outside, good insulation and seals.
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