Electric Problem or overloading the circuit

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Twayne, the more you post on this topic, the more you look like an idiot. Read the thread from the very beginning. *My* first post in the thread was maybe the third response the OP received -- and the first four words of that post are "Call an electrician NOW".
I understand the dangers of the OP's situation just fine -- what you fail to understand is that there is no reason at all to suppose that his problems are in any way related to an Edison circuit.

If you knew anything at all about the subject, you would know that's not true. Tell me this: if Edison circuits are "inherently dangerous", why are they permitted under both the NEC and the CEC?
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Mmm, I shold probably direct YOU to the reread and who said what. I did not even come close to using the phrase "Edison Ciruit" until someone magically inserted it into the thread. Then, since I know such circuits fairly well, I invited him to clarify which part of Edicon Circuit" he was referring to, he had nothing to say. That says to me he was parroting something, hoping to change the subject to an area he could better argue instead of the OPs issues, which is known to be a tactic of, well, certain types of ng participants who really don't participate. It almost worked, too; I wasn't careful enough in my wording back to him I guess. I don't anywhere in this thread recall EVER saying that YOU didn't tell the OP to call a pro, the only logical thing for his apparent expertise level. If I did, I apologize, because there WERE several posts telling him to get a pro in. I think I hit Send too soon and had to add mine as a PS, but I recommended the same thing. It's often difficult to tell who is responding to whom unless the entire thread is displayed onscreen, but you seem to have erred.
That's not to say I didn't respond to another part of your post that was in error; I don't recall it and don't feel it worth looking up the whole thread. I'd simply respond with the same answer again. When details don't exist in a post, nothing useful can be gotten from it. It appears that my attitude was that you lacked an understanding of something in the OP's post and had stated it more than once, prompting my "if you're too thick" comment. You can live in the past if you wish, but I prefer to look forward. If you have something specific you'd like to work out, I'll be OK with that but otherwise I think our communicatiosn are pretty much at an end here.
Twayne
In wrote:

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True -- you described one, without knowing what it was called, and said that double-pole breakers weren't supposed to be used "to provide two 110 vac lines" (which is absolutely false).

!!!
In another post, you say you've never actually had your hands on a double-pole breaker -- so how in the world do you know *anything* about an Edison circuit?? [snip]

No, you said I was "too thick to understand the dangers of the OP's situation". Since my *very first* post in the thread said "Call an electrician NOW", it should be obvious -- even to you -- that I very clearly understand "the dangers of the OP's situation".

I don't have any trouble keeping track of who's responding to whom....

ROTFLMAO!
I'm the one who responded to *your* posts that were in error, not the other way around.

The details are there -- you just weren't paying attention.

And, as noted, it's glaringly obvious to anyone with an even rudimentary ability to comprehend written English that I understand very clearly that the OP's situation is quite dangerous.

Our communication will continue as long as you continue to dispense dangerous and factually incorrect advice.

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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 00:05:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Perhaps he is familiar with them in a "fused" panel? My house has at least 3 "edison circuits" and not a single breaker, ganged or otherwise. What it DOES have is double fuse "pullouts" which. by the way, can NOT be accidentally installed so that both circuits are on the same "leg" of the service. Unfortuneately, in the vast majority of breaker panels, improper installation is VERY easy, resulting in the situation where the neutral carries twice (actually the sum of) the individual circuit current when both circuits are loaded.
When installed this way - they ARE dangerous.
Our local code, last time I checked, allowed "edison" circuits ONLY for "split" receptacles, and those "split" receptacles were restricted to a single area. IE, one "edison circuit" could feed (split) kitchen countertop receptacles and, for instance, an over counter light IN THE KITCHEN, but could not be extended to the bathroom next to the kitchen.
A ganged breaker (or fuse pullout) can also be used on a non-edison circuit to act as a "disconnect" to either a sub-panel or to 2 circuits serving a particular area/function for safety or convenience purposes. For example, to kill ALL power to a basement, a garage, a shed, or a particular room which is served by 2 circuits. In this application it would be perfectly legal and safe to have the 2 circuits on the same "leg" (note I do not refer to them as "phases") of the service.

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wrote:

His other posts make it abundantly clear he isn't familiar with them at all.

I believe that's not just "local code" for you -- I'm pretty sure that's required by the CEC. Here in the U.S., though, the NEC does not apply such restrictions to their use.
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 03:39:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

comes to safety. CSA approved means more stringent requirements than UL, for instance.
Americans shout "socialism" and "tea party" when the government sticks their noses into their everyday lives. Up here we have resigned ourselves to the fact that the "nanny state" is here to stay, and many of us are better off for it, regardless how bad it sometimes tastes.
Our BANKING industry is also much more closely regulated - for which I am also thankfull this last year or so.
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In typed:

Hot conduit is NOT a sign of wrong amperage breakers! Hot conduit means there is a LOT of current trying to find earth ground! There should never be any current in it under non-fault conditions and to get hot, it's a hell of a LOT of current. I think there's more to it than those two breakers unless it's the case that one ganged breaker cannot overcome the non-overloaded one to open them up. Compliance labs routinely test conduit for 60A withstand, measureing voltage across every joint encountered, and the conduit never heated up. Something's awfully wrong and IMO very DANGEROUS there.

Thus it's a seriously miswired and dangerous ckt; agreed.
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Actually, it's much more likely to mean hysterisis heating. But you wouldn't know that. Stick to giving advice on subjects you know something about (if there are any). This isn't one of them.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Huh? As in magnetic? What's being magnetized?

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cjt wrote:

The OP mentioned loosening the conduit fitting and getting a spark. That says to me that the conduit is carrying current.
nate
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wrote:

It could be an induced current.
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 20:20:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

current? where you have both conductors of a circuit running parallel to each other inside the same conduit????
I'd like to see that work.
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wrote:

That, my friend, is assuming facts not in evidence. That the conduit gets hot enough to burn paint (as the OP stated) is strongly suggestive that both conductors of the circuit are *not* in fact "running parallel to each other inside the same conduit". If they *are*, then of course there would be no heating. Given the apparent mess that is the OP's wiring, and given his confused description of it, I should say there's no reason whatever to assume that the circuit was installed correctly with both conductors inside the same conduit.

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Me, too.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

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wrote:

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The conduit, of course -- pretty easy to happen when the hot wire of a circuit is inside a metal conduit, and the neutral isn't, or vice versa.
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On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 20:19:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

hot???
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wrote:

60Hz works for induction cooktops, doesn't it??
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On Mon, 28 Dec 2009 09:54:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

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