Electric Meter

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Doug Miller wrote:

You haven't been studying U.S. bureaucratize.
We have (at least) male, female, gay, lesbian, and various incarnations of "transgender."
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On 6/29/2010 7:39 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Is there a politically correct bureaucratize description for "pecker head"? :-)
TDD
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On Tue, 29 Jun 2010 03:19:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I forgot where I first heard about that, but searching the internet quickly found Polish at http://claritaslux.com/blog/the-hardest-language-to-learn/ .
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It's incorrect in at least one major respect: there are *not* seven genders in Polish as claimed. Only three. The masculine gender is further subdivided, making distinctions between persons and animate and inanimate objects, making five gender "classes" in all, but only three genders -- not seven.
The article also refers to Polish pronunciation as "very difficult"; I disagree. Polish pronunciation and spelling follow regular rules, and I found it much easier to learn to pronounce Polish correctly than French.
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On 6/19/2010 8:28 AM, George wrote:

I have a customer who's water meter is in the ceiling of his business. There is an electronic sensor on the meter with a cable going through the wall to an optical interface for an external reader.
TDD
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(Doug Miller) wrote:

In downstate NY many older gas meters and electric meters are located inside. It's still OK , at least for electric on multi-family buildings, but single and two family dwellings meters have to go outside.
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On 6/19/2010 8:04 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

I've seen them in basements where the meter reader looked through a window to read the meter. I've met meter readers who used binoculars to read meters. Perhaps an aggressive dog kept them at a distance?
TDD
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Inside-the-house meters are very common in my area too. (Baltimore) Myold house had both gas and electric inside, current house has gasinside & electric outside. BGE changed the gas meter to a remote-read type about 5 years ago. I believe they read it form a receiver in a vehicle. A meter reader still comes into the yard to read the electric meter.
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in (Doug Miller) wrote:

My place was built in 1912. The gas meter was in the crawspace. I asked the gas company to move it , and they wanted $300. A couple years go by and the gas company replaces the main line on the street and lines to the houses. They moved the meter for free, sweet :)
My neighbor had the electric meter in her kitchen , right beside the disconnect switch and fuse box. The next guy who bought the place was required to upgrade the electric service to 100 amp, so the meter got moved along with a new panel box.
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On 6/19/2010 12:04, TheHack wrote:

Sometimes you can luck out when it's convenient for the utility to make a mutually beneficial infrastructure upgrade.

This sounds like a standard arrangement for houses without basements using K&T wiring. Service upgrades calling for a new meter often have it placed outside for purposes of reading (made obsolete by smart meters) and emergency service disconnect.
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*Many indoor meters are still around in NJ. I grew up in a 1960's house with an indoor gas meter. I see plenty of indoor electric meters still. Many single family row houses in urban areas have their meters inside I'm guessing because there was no place else to put them and the service comes underground into the basement.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Do you really expect people to go outside to put a quarter in the meter?
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Doug Miller wrote:

I've since moved away from that house so I cannot take a picture, but my last house had the gas meter inside. I suggest you travel to Philadelphia where you will see thousands of homes built that way. The gas meter reader used to come every month knocking on the back door. Natural gas was very common in Philly. My meter was located in the basement at the front of the house. Gas main is in the street. Some newer (1970's) houses were built with a glass block in the foundation and the meter behind it. That way the meter reader did not have to go inside, he could just look through the window.
If you need an address, I can tell you thousands of them. Entire streets full of row houses, all with meters inside. Some were build in the 1910 era, my house was built in 1948. Many others from many other years.
As for electric meters, I don't know of any in a house, but I do know of some inside industrial buildings. I can send you photos of that come Monday when I go back to work. I read them on the 25th of every month for our purposes, the electric company reads them at some other time.
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I'll be darned. Learn something new every day.

Photo not needed there, Ed. I've seen indoor electric meters in commercial/industrial installations myself. Never in a house, though.
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When my parents moved house in 1965, we lived there till 1975. I think both meters were indoors. The "new house", also in a Rochester NY suburb, has gas and electric meters indoors. Both in the cellar. Many of the houses near me have meters in the cellar.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I don't have a photo, but the house I grew up in outside Detroit had the gas meter inside ca. 1960. My dad's house in the same area did up until we sold it a couple of years ago. They added a remote outside gauge on it 10 or 15 years ago. -- Doug
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

My gas meter is inside - pipe comes in underground. Just about all installations are like this in the northeast.
Water is also all inside.
Electricity depends. Older installations are inside. Newer ones are typically outside.
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Not true. Our gas meters were outside.

Yes, with a remote digital display outside.

Where "newer" = >fifty years.
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(Doug Miller) wrote:

I've lived in houses in Maryland (built 1971) that have had the meters inside (Mom HATED that) and in olders houses (built 1941) that have all 3 meters (water, gas, electric) on the outside. Once I lived in a place (D.C.) that had no electric meter at all. The previous occupants had done their own hookup to the pole and since it was a second floor apartment, no one ever caught on while I lived there. I learned later that the utilities can bill you for usage anyway based on estimated use if the meter is bad or missing entirely.

I imagine the big push is because of liability issues first and workforce reduction second. It's just another mechanism that causes jobs to evaporate. I'll be interested in seeing if employment rates ever really recover in the US. I don't see how that will occur given that all the current trends are working against it.
I was pleased to read that for the first time, US cars are getting higher marks for initial quality than foreign ones.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/jun/17/us-vehicles-rank-higher-than-imports-for-first-tim /
"For the first time ever, J.D. Power and Associates has rated U.S.-brand vehicles higher than import brands in its prestigious annual Initial Quality Study. The study - now in its 24th year - is taken as the standard by which foreign and domestic cars are judged in the auto industry and is frequently cited in ads."
It only took half a century for us to catch up. There's still hope left.
I'll bet Toyota's runaway cars had something to do with it. BP's troubles seem to have helped take the heat off Toyoto. I shudder to think what will take the heat off BP in the same way.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

I doubt old meters are worth enough to try to sell. They will just scrap them for the metal. You can buy a refurb meter (set to 0000) for $10-15 bucks the last time I looked. I have a couple, one I got for free (not set to 0000)
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