Electric drill question


I have two Porter Cable electric drills. One uses a 14 volt rechargeable battery and the other a 12 volt. The 12 volt battery appears to work on the 14 volt drill quite well. The question is - if I were to use it in place the 14 would it damage the battery? The 14 is about shot.
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Dave




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Should be fine ... you already tried it. There will be a bit less torque and power.
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Charles Schuler wrote:

And more current. Thus more heat, both for the battery and the drill motor. Might shorten life of both.
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wrote:

When will this insanity stop? In a DC motor less voltage means less current, not more. ... by the square of the difference.
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Bah humbug. Just use a corded drill.
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On 20 Feb 2007 07:24:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That sounds like kind of a jerky answer, but it is a good point. Cordless drills are great tools, but they are not always needed. I use mine when I am working outdoors or out in my work shed or garage. I even use it in my house, if I am in a place when I can't easily drag an extension cord.
However, my corded drills have more gitty-up for things like drilling into masonry and work just fine on anything else that is close to an outlet.
All that being said... I still like having the cordless drill around for those times when it makes my task less grueling.
H
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I've really only used mine for screwing in gutter screws. I could have done it with a corded drill, but the cordless drill was lighter and easier to handle up and down the ladder.
It was great for gutter screws.

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com writes:

In a permanent magnet DC motor, less voltage means lower speed. The current is determined by torque, not voltage. If you're driving something that takes more torque at higher speed, then reducing speed also reduces torque and current. But with a constant-torque load, the current will be about the same at any speed.
    Dave
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Ahh, but the RDTCGC (reactive drillbit torque conversion gear clutch) will wear faster due to the variance in voltage! ;-)
Shoot! I've got to go now, I mistakenly put a 6V bulb in my 2-D cell battery flashlight then left it on and it's melting all over the table now........
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