Electric connection

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On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 20:24:00 -0700 (PDT), Eric in North TX

From what he said he's only making a "feed through extention cord" to get power INTO the hose. Sounds like a couple of extention cords to connect selected important loads as required.
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Thanks everyone, and RBM for the link to exactly what I'm looking for! I hacked around on the web and hadn't come across anything like that. I'll check the local electric supply shops (now that I know what to ask for!) and see if I can get one for the weekend! It's been 1 yr since Hurricane Ike went thru Ohio and we were without power for a week. Wasn't all that much of an issue then because the weather was warm, but I'm sure the next time it will be 20 below and I certainly don't want to have a window cracked to run the wire thru!
Thanks again....
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I hear you, about power cuts. I'm in NY, not far from Ohio. We do power cuts in the winter, which are miserable. The cold soaks into homes in a hurry, when the furnace is out. I live in a mobile home. For me, the front door is loose enough to run a cord under. I run the furnace off the generator for about an hour and then let the generator cool, and bring it indoors.
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Since it's not completely clear from your post, if that outlet is normally powered from the house wiring, make sure you have a way to disconnect the "inlet" from it when not in use, so you don't have powered prongs outside that someone could touch...
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Sorry for the confusion Larry. This will be a 'closed circuit so to speak. The flanged inlet mounted on the outside of the house with about 6 ft of wire between it and the duplex outlet inside on the basement wall. It will only be energized when a cord is attached to the flanged inlet from the generator. I'll label the outlet appropriately so people will know why it is dead most of the time, as well as put a sheet with instructions for it's use near by. I.E. "Power from Generator only. Connect Generator to flanged inlet on side of house to energize."
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I assumed that was what you meant, but thought it was worth making sure.
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He did write that he wants to wire the reverse socket into a regular socket in the cellar. Run power cords from the regular socket in the cellar.
One more thing to prepare in advance. Harvest an electrical cord off an old appliance, such as dehumidifier, or AC. Store that near the furnace. When the power is out, you can open the connection box on the side of the furnace. Using wire nuts, connect the old electric cord to the furnace wires, and then you can plug your furnace into extension cord. Please reconnect the hard wired power, later.
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On Sep 16, 8:22am, "Stormin Mormon"

A better remedy is to install a flanged inlet of the proper size in a Jbox at the furnace and to place a double pole double throw switch such as this offering from Hubbel. http://www.hubbellcatalog.com/wiring/section-c-datasheet.asp?PN=HBL1386&FAM=Switches&P=13973,12050,1099 -- Tom Horne
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 08:22:44 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Connect the furnace with a plug into a receptacle to start with and it becomes as simple as "pull the plug, plug it in".
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Such is true. The NEC specifies hard wired, not sure why.
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Mark wrote:

Once you find the outlet, wire it to a new breaker in the box. This breaker will normally be left in the OFF position.
When the power fails: 1. Flip the main switch to OFF 2. Flip this new breaker to ON 3. Start the generator
You now have power to half your house (or all your house if your generator puts out 220 and you used a dual breaker).
You can modulate the load on your generator by keeping things in your house (lights, microwave, etc.) powered off so as to not exceed the capacity of your generator.
When the power returns: 1. Power down the generator 2. Unplug the cable 3. Turn OFF the new circuit breaker(s) 4. Turn the mains back ON
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Thanks folks for all these suggestions. I may apply some of them once I get the wiring for connecting the generator installed (procrastinated as usual, but want to do it before the weather turns cold!)
I had even looked into something like you're suggesting H-B. In fact I'm really lucky that when I had a new panel put in a few years ago the electrician actually put the circuits in in such a way that my furnace, Refrig, and a lighting circuit in the family room / kitchen, Master Bedroom, and bath all fall on the same side of the panel! (Purely blind luck I'm sure since he didn't bother to label any of these and I had to go thru the house figuring them all out!)
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Mark wrote:

Check the web site of your breaker box manufacturer. Some have a gizmo that functions as an emergency disconnect. Here's how it works.
The circuit breaker(s) that connect to your generator plug is mounted in the top-right slot of your box. The gizmo is a flat piece of metal that touches both the mains switch and this circuit breaker and the gizmo slides back and forth. The geometry is such that both the mains switch and the circuit breaker cannot both be on at the same time.
The mains switch cannot be turned ON unless the circuit breaker is OFF. Likewise the circuit breaker cannot be turned ON unless the mains switch is OFF. The purpose is to prevent the service line from being energized by your generator.
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Mark wrote:

From your other post "My generator isn't big enough to use a transfer switch and try and power the entire house."
Why not do it safe and legal? A transfer switch isn't as complex as you think. You can run the above mentioned circuits through the transfer switch easily and safely. Only a very large generator would use a transfer switch to power the entire house. You can get a transfer switch that powers only 4, 6, or 8 or more circuits. Sounds like you only need 4 or 6.
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wrote:

Still ILLEGAL and potentially dangerous.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Absolutely legal.
Breaker-box manufacturers even make interconnect lock-outs to facilitate this sequence. http://stores.interlockkit.com/-strse-53/Kit-K-dsh-5010 -(QO-&/Detail.bok
These kits mechanically tie the main power switch to the circuit breaker fed by the generator.
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wrote:

ONLY legal if the manufacturer of the box provides a UL type approved breaker interlock for that panel, and it is installed.
The OP did not mention an interlock, and no, making your own is NOT legal (although it would make it safer)
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HeyBub wrote:

That is completely illegal and very unsafe. Use this rule of thumb when hooking up generators... If you can accidentally send power from the generator to the mains coming into the house, (forget to turn off the main off) it is dangerous, illegal, and can kill someone. Why not just do it safe and legally? It's really not that difficult.
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Get one from yiour local RV dealer.
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