Electric connection

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Kind of hard to describe what I'm looking for here. I think on RVs and 5th wheels, and I know on the 'beer wagon' get from the distributor for our church festival, there is a 'reverse' receptacle where you connect an extension cord to power the lights and such. This device looks similar to a single receptacle with a flip-up cover, but under the cover is actually a plug (male) rather than a receptacle (female) connector. You plug the female 'outlet' end of an extension cord into this, and the other end into a power source. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
What I want to do, if I can find such a thing that would fit on a standard exterior electric box, is mount one on the back of my house with the wiring running to a standard outlet mounted in my basement. I'd then be able to plug a cord from my generator into this, and then supply my freezer, refrig, lights, etc. from the outlet in the basement. This would keep me from having to run the extension cord from the generator thru an open window in cold weather. Also when it wasn't in use it wouldn't be too obtrusive such as a plain old wire running thru the side of the house.
Any thoughts on this? Or other ideas for something along these lines?
Mark
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It is called a flanged inlet, or motor plug. Nothing wrong with your idea at all.
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RBM wrote:

I use an outside 220 volt dryer outlet to plug in my generator. I made a cord with the standard 4 prong drier and put an L14-30 connector on the other end to plug in my generator ( being sure to power off the MAIN BREAKER before) That will power the entire house. Of course you want to manage your loads and not run everything at the same time. You might also want to shut off the (electric)water heater and (electric)oven during generator time unless you have a really big one.
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What is an "outside 220 volt dryer outlet" ? I would expect that most people keep their electric dryers inside, no?
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RBM wrote:

You just get a dryer outlet and put it in an outside box. Put an L14-30P instead if you like.
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Truthfully, I find either, just as dangerous
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RBM wrote:

Anything that heats main breaker box without a proper transfer switch is stupid, and should be illegal. (probably is in some places.) This has been discussed multiple times on here before. Sure, YOU know what is going on. But what if you are gone, sick, injured, or dead, and some helpful neighbor comes over to help your wife and kids? And then, around 0200, the borrowed out-of-state lineman truck finally makes it through to your neighborhood, and reconnects that dropped line down the street that feeds your can? Hopefully he checks the dropped line and follows all the safety procedures, but when the calls are stacked up and he has been on duty for 18-20 hours, well, sometimes things happen. It just ain't worth the risk.
If you aren't willing/able to spend the money for a proper setup, put the critical devices (furnace, well, etc) on pigtails, and have a completely separate set of wires out to the genset. OP is doing it the right low-buck way.
-- aem sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

Hopefully the linesman is careful, sees the danger, but hooks it up anyway... instantly destroying the generator. :-) (The grid power will hardly flicker as the generator is destroyed) If I were the linesman I'd do it purposely just to fuck with the cheap ass idiots who don't give a fuck about the law or the life of the linesman.
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 17:33:46 -0400, Van Chocstraw

Officially illegal and dangerous, but often done. I would not recommend it.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

It isn't very difficult to do the job safely and legally. Why risk killing a linesman?
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That's what I did. Works great.
KC
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Mark wrote:

Hi, Easiest thing to do will be to go to your local RV shop and get an pid tail adapter or whatever you need. I used to own a fair size 5th wheel. I made an adapter with receptacles and proper gauge cable to get power to the unit in any camp ground. It worked fine and was very convenient.
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The suggestion of the RV shop is on the mark. A couple of considerations, if you are energizing the house wiring, you will only hit half of it unless you are putting in 220v, and it would be required that you throw the main breaker or somehow disconnect from the grid, so you don't fry linemen trying to repair the outage.
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I'm only going to bring a line in from this device to a duplex outlet mounted on the basement wall. From there I'll bring my extension cords up to the Refrig and living area. My generator isn't big enough to use a transfer switch and try and power the entire house. (if our power was less reliable I'd be going that route for sure).
wrote:

The suggestion of the RV shop is on the mark. A couple of considerations, if you are energizing the house wiring, you will only hit half of it unless you are putting in 220v, and it would be required that you throw the main breaker or somehow disconnect from the grid, so you don't fry linemen trying to repair the outage.
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I think Mark is exactly 'on the mark'. The 220 volt comment is really unnecessary and not what he is mentioning or requires. His solution means that if/when the commercial power fails, he will manually unplug his fridge etc. from their regular outlet/s and plug them in to this special outlet which will be powered only from his generator outside. There would appear to be no chance whatsoever of having his generator output be connected in any way with the 'normal' AC distribution of the house. Hence no chance of electrocuting a linesman! A neat way as Mark says of not having to run an extension cord through a window during winter.
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The plan needs a couple things. First, the power cord to the furnace. Second, generators are a very high theft item during power cuts. While running, they should be chained to a tree, and preferably watched at all times.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Which suggests that a proper transfer switch is a better idea. He did suggest wiring the inlet to a socket in the cellar, and then running cords from that. So, the OP didn't sound like he was going to power up the wires in the walls of his house.
--
Christopher A. Young
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Eric Please don't take this as a personal attack when I point out that many homes do not have a single main breaker. There are literally millions of homes in the US that have split buss panels for their service equipment. I run into cross connected circuits all the time when I'm doing trouble shooting and such a cross connection can provide a sneak current path that can bypass one open breaker and back feed via another one. Considering the variability of electrical service installations it really is necessary to use only listed transfer switches or interlock assemblies to supply a homes wiring from an alternate source of power. To do anything else is to gamble with lineman's lives. -- Tom Horne
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On Wed, 16 Sep 2009 08:20:02 -0700 (PDT), Tom Horne

Connecting to a DEDICATED duplex receptacle that is not connected to anything else can in no POSSIBLE way result in cross-connections, backfeeds, or ANY other illegal or dangerous eventuality. It is NO gamble.
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