Electric Code question

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Just curious.. In many houses I've owned I've added electrical outlets by tapping into the electric that comes into the box where the light switch is. Usually I put the added electric outlet down by the floor like most outlets are. Is tapping into the lighting circuit to add outlets any sort of code violation? The only thing I can think is that it obviously adds more potential draw to the lighting circuit but it's still protected by it's breaker so other then the lights going off if the breaker trips it doesn't matter. Does the code prohibit mixing lights and outlets on the same circuit or anything? I've had old houses that actually had a plug as a factory part of the light fixture over the sink.
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On 05/14/2015 03:44 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

I don't know but I'd guess that if a new outlet was installed in a bedroom, the receptacle would have to be on an arc fault breaker.
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On Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 4:27:44 PM UTC-4, Mayhem wrote:

its a bad idea, since a tripped breaker will turn out the lights. so current code keeps them seperated......
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On Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 4:38:22 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

AFAIK, there is no code requirement to keep receptacles on a separate circuit from lights. And Ashton could tap into a light circuit for an additional outlet. As M pointed out, if it's being added in an area that now requires, AFCI, GFCI, etc then those issues are supposed to be dealt with, but that's a different subject.
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On Thu, 14 May 2015 15:25:26 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I have usually used a GFI receptacle when I add them, always if in a bathroom.
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wrote:

Not sure about "current" code, but "normal practice" or "best practices" a few years ago were lights and outlets "in a given room" on separate circuits, but lights in one room and outlets in another room could be on the same circuit. Been a few years since I worked with my dad, an electrician - and things DO change.
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On Thu, 14 May 2015 21:00:24 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I think our house built in 1939 was like that, and even as a child I saw the advantage of having either the desk lamp or the ceiling light still working when a fuse blew.
Or maybe it was the house built in 1952
Of course they ruined this by not putting ceiling lights in bedrooms anymore.

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On 5/14/2015 4:38 PM, bob haller wrote:

> out the lights. so current code keeps them > seperated......

I'd heard that maybe 30 years ago, they try to keep the lights on separate circuit.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 14 May 2015 21:28:40 -0400, Stormin Mormon

That is a design issue and the NEC says in the introduction that this is not a design manual, It only addresses safety. 240.4(D) insures you will trip a breaker before you overload the conductor on "small conductors". ( 14 & 12 ga) The 80% safety factor is built into the maximum breaker size (15 & 20a).
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Don't know about thew US of A, but here in Canada lights and outlets on the same circuit are commonplace BUT there is a limit to how many loads can be on a circuit - can't remember offhand how many - but regardless of the current draw, only "X" devices per circuit.
Also, tapping into the lighting circuit at the switch is NOT a recommended practice. Better to daisy chain off an existing outlet - but even then it is important to know how the circuit is wired.
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wrote:

There is no restriction to the number of outlets, receptacle or otherwise on 15 and 20a circuits in general lighting areas. General lighting means just that, the 15 and 20 amp circuits in the dwelling and they can serve lights and receptacles. That changes a little in the kitchen or in bathrooms. but I am guessing that is not what we are talking about. The issue might be whether there is a neutral present. If so, no sweat. The other issue will be box fill. Usually the boxes tend to be full already so adding a circuit will overfill them.
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On Thu, 14 May 2015 21:42:05 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

In Canada there is a limit of 8 outlets on a 15 amp circuit. I believe a maximum of 12 combined outlets and lights.. Ontario code allows lights, for sure. Each individual light fixture: counts as 1 Ceiling fans: usually count as 3, 1.5 for lights & 1.5 for fan. Range hoods: count as 2 General purpose receptacles, hallway, living rooms etc: count as 1 Home theater, computer areas: if its a dedicated area, put it on its own cct. Garages and outside receptacles: don't go more than 2 per cct, Sumps: Usually by themselves, but do yourself a favor and put 1 regularly used light on with it (hallway,entry etc) that way if it does trip you'll know sooner rather than wetter.
Kitchens, bedrooms and bathrooms have their own rules which you'd have to follow.
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Ashton Crusher wrote:

You have neutrals in your switch boxes in addition to the hot?
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For newer construction in the US, that is standard. In other countries (like the UK) it isn't.
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around here 14 gauge romex outer jacket is one color, and can only be put on a 15 amp breaker. normally used for lightng only.
12 gauge has a different color, 20 amp max
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wrote:

coloured jacket not required by code though -----
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On 5/15/2015 8:01 AM, bob haller wrote:

If memory is working, 14 gage is yellow, 12 gage is white, and 10 gage is orange.
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In typed:

Not in the USA. If you mean NM, 12/2 is yellow. 16/2 is white.
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In typed:

Oops, I meant to write:
If you mean NM cable, 12/2 is yellow. 14/2 (not 16/2) is white. http://www.electriciantalk.com/f2/romex-jacket-color-codes-49/
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On 5/16/2015 12:42 PM, TomR wrote:

I was thinking Romex. Wish the various types of wires had same colors for us in the real world.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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