Electric Breaker Out of Slots

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Consider upgrading to 200 amps. Your electric use has increased since 1985 and that 100 amps is marginal.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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I can't help you with question #1, but here in Westerville, OH, I upgraded our old Federal Pacific 100A/12 slot panel to a SquareD 200A/40 slot. The cost of the parts, permit, etc. (plus a few new tools <G>) was about $500. A neighbor had theirs replaced by a electrician, total was about $1,300. Of course, the professional did it in about 1/3 the time (about 3 hours, including re-connection by the electric co.)
(Before I get flamed, I am NOT trying to imply that the cost of having an electrican is a rip off or anything. With an electrican, you're paying for the training, skill, and peace of mind. In my case, I've worked on this type of thing and similar items, and did a lot of research, including talking to the building inspector. The local code allows the homeowner to do the work, even if they're not a licensed electrican.)
Mike O.
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Another option is to add a propane stove and forget about adding an electric stove. I did this because my house only had a 100 amp service and I didn't want the extra load. Many people like cooking with gas better then electric too. If you want to go with the electric stove then I would buy the twin breakers to free up the slots and see how it works. You can always upgrade to 200 amps down the road. You're looking at some bucks for a new service which might not be needed. It all depends on how your circuits are laid out and how you use your appliances, etc. I never blow fuses so I'm not looking to upgrade.
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Houseslave wrote:

You'll get a laugh out of this. This is a kitchen re-model. There was a natural gas range in place but it stuck out 2 inches from the rest of the cabinets. So the lady of the house went to a Kitchen Design place and they suggested an under counter electric oven which would be flush with the cabinets and allows for a gas cook top on top of the oven. If there was an under-the-counter gas oven that would allow a gas cooktop on the top that would be ideal but there isn't any that I could find.
So the bottom line is that to get rid of the 2 inches sticking out into the kitchen, it may cost $1500 for an electrician.
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On 17 Nov 2003, Arnie Goetchius wrote:

There's a joke in there somewhere about how guys always -think- they could stand another 2", but I'm not gonna go there. <g> In the immortal words of ol' slick Clinton: "Ah feel your pain."
--
Baisez-les s'ils ne peuvent pas prendre une plaisanterie
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I-zheet M'drurz wrote:

Oh my.. The tears ran down my leg!! Thanks for your response.
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For the cooktop, gas is preferred by most chefs. I don't think there's anything particularly more appealing about a gas oven. Convection ovens are all electric, if memory serves. I've heard that the new ideal is gas top, electric under.

2" sticking out into the kitchen can be expensive indeed. I can see it now: "Does this new oven make my ass look fatter?"
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Mike O. wrote:

Thanks for the response on the cost. I guess I could budget for $1500 and then see what kind of response I get from some local electricians.
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