Electric baseboard: hydronic vs. convection?

Hi, I'd like some advice. Finishing my basement (one big room of 20x30) and want to use electric base board heat (as a backup to my mini-split heat pump). I've read about the d ifference between regular (cheaper) convection electric baseboards and (mor e pricey) electric hydronic. I like hydronic heat. I've also noticed a go od number of complaints that electric hydronic baseboards don't seem to las t many years. My basement will NOT get continual use, but I don't want to invest only to see it be wasted. What has you experience been with electri c hydronic? All comments appreciated. Thanks Theodore.
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Hi Theodore,

I don't have any experience with electric hydronic, but I have used portable "oil" filled baseboard heaters. The heating element heats up the oil and the oil then heats the room.
I don't think these are any more efficient than a simple electric baseboard ehater, but they do even out the heat. It's more of a gradual constant heat than the heating and cooling cycles of most heaters. Since the heating element isn't exposed, there's no burning dust smell when their used either (especially at the start of the heating season). Ours worked fine for many years until we got rid of them (didn't need them in the new house).
For a simple electric backup heat source, you might consider small in-wall electric heaters (like those made by King Electric or Cadet). They take up very little wall space, and the fan helps circulate the air in the room.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On Mon, 2 May 2016 04:14:44 -0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I agree the oil filled heaters are a more even heat, but as far as saving electricity, there really is no advantage to any specific heater type. A watt of electricity will only generate so many BTUs, no matter how it's used. Electric heat is the most expensive heat source.
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On 05/02/2016 05:34 AM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

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FWIW: I installed a standard convection type 30 years ago and it still works fine. The room is my wife's studio which is fairly large. In the coldest part of winter, she really cranks that thing up and it adds about $100 a month to the electric bill.
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On 5/1/2016 11:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

my mini-split heat pump). I've read about the difference between regular (cheaper) convection electric baseboards and (more pricey) electric hydronic. I like hydronic heat. I've also noticed a good number of complaints that electric hydronic baseboards don't seem to last many years. My basement will NOT get continual use, but I don't want to invest only to see it be wasted.
What has you experience been with electric hydronic?

My one experience with electric baseboard heat was that it is a terribly expensive way to heat. This was in the mid 1980s, and the price of the electric was really extreme. I'm not sure if this is the case for you, where you are. Some places, electric is not as expensive.
Either device should produce the same BTU per watt, as I understand. 1500 watts makes 5,200 BTU. The hydrionic heat is probably slower to warm up, and slower to cool down.
Neither will add humidity to the air, so you may have a dry air feel with your heat.
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We have fairly cheap electric rates (8.61 cents per kilowatt) here in the Pacific Northwest. We use electric wall heaters for all heating, water heating, appliances, lighting, water pump, etc.
We average about 30-40 kwh/day during the summer, and about 50-70 during the winter.
Our current electric bill is $102 per month (equal pay plan).
We spend twice that on a weeks worth of groceries, so our electric bill is not a big part of our budget.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Thanks for all replies so far. I'm in the northeast, so electric is not cheap, but considering this isn't a continual use room, and it's mostly underground, and it's got a heat pump , and the main house's hydronic loop is exposed and overhead throughout the basement, I think electric baseboard for the basement is an ok solution fo r me.
Just wondering if anyone has had issues with longevity of these hydronic el ectric units vs. regular electric baseboard. And I understand that regular electric baseboard often smells of burning dust... which is annoying but t olerable.
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