Edges of concrete paver bricks are wet

The edges of some newly installed (end of August) pavers are damp most of the time, even those that are under a ceiling and protected from rain. My guess is that the sand between the pavers is wicking up moisture from the clay soil below the stone dust bedding layer. My concern is damage that might occur when winter temperatures (central New Jersey) drop below freezing for prolonged periods. Am I worried needlessly?
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I might also suspect condensation (cool pavers, moist air) . My pavers are aways wet until the sun hits them. It is more prevalent on humid days than dry days.

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That's also the case. Some of the pavers have damp centers; others, damp edges. So condensation is also a factor.
Thanks.
Jmagerl wrote:

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Ray Kostanty wrote:

If they are really pavers, they should be OK. Common brick could be a problem.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

since there will be rainy days in the winter followed by freezing nights and freezing days. So they should be able to withstand the cold. But it certainly isn't attractive looking at the wet edges, regardless of whether it's winter or summer.
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