Easiest way to ground a computer?

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Troll

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Julie P. wrote:

Methinks ou are either a wise guy trying to put us on or an ignoranus being serious.
Which is it?
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Julie P. wrote:

Assuming things are as screwed up in your house as you say, what problem is it you are really trying to solve? What is the point of this whacky ground?
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First of all, many many homes do not have grounded outlets.
Second, I've seen other people attach a wire and run it out the window to the ground.
Third many people attach the wire to a cold water pipe.
So I'm looking for solutions, not sarcasm.
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On Fri, 06 May 2005 01:14:18 -0400, Julie P. wrote:

Where do you live?

I would report that to the nearest building inspector, if I ever saw it.

That's the proper way to do it.

So attach a ground bus to the cold water pipe, with solder. Not the "painted radiator pipe", you ignorant bitch.
--
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Troll

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None of this answers my original question: WHY do you feel you need to do this?
What benefit do you think you will gain from this ground?
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wrote:

Julie P., I'd like you to meet USENET READER... USENET READER, meet Julie. P!
rusty redcloud
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Julie P. wrote:

Hi, I won't live in a place like that. But as long as you know it, wrapping is not enough, you need a clamp type ground connector. Sure the radiator is grounded? Must be VERY old building. Ever heard of ground loop which may create more problem than not having ground at all. As long as you know. Safety always first. Tony
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What would you do though if you were looking at houses to rent? Pull out a receptacle at each one you visit to see if it is grounded?

I am not sure, that is why I was asking. If I get ambitious I will simply run a ground wire form the receptacle to the neutral bus bar on the panel. But I do not want to do something where it takes too much time since it is not my house and it would only be a temporary set up (there is no way I would improve the house and then just leave it after I move out). If I happen to add another circuit or two for my office, I could just add the ground wires then.

Thanks Tony. It was built in the 1800's.
J.
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Julie
To get an earth ground, you must pound a ten foot copper coated ground rod into the ground and clamp a wire to it. For a 20 amp circuit, the ground wire should be 12 gauge. In a building as old as yours, you could also attach the ground wire to the metal water pipe where it enters the building. Make sure you sand off any paint or corrosion, you must ground to bare metal. Use a clamp, don't just wrap the wire around the pipe.
Pay no attention to Matt. That is just his idea of humor, making trouble for other people. He likes to belittle people who call him nasty names, but there are no nice names for Matt. The more I hear from him, the more I am convinced of that.
Stretch
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Great advice, Stretch.
Not only did you show your unique ability to be trolled with ease, but you also just gave out incorrect, dangerous info.
Good job.
Keep it up!
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Says a troll who is so full of it, he has to post x-no-archive.

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what you propose is pointless. 'ground' is relative. without your electrical service being 'grounded' to the same ground as the coathanger its just a floating ground. same as if you just used a pair of snippers and cut the third prong off the plug.
randy

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xrongor wrote:

coathanger its

and cut

This is actually a pretty good point. A makeshift ground may do more harm than good; in the extreme worse case, suppose you "ground" to a water pipe which is not itself grounded (suppose the water service has never been upgraded and is still lead, or has been upgraded recently with plastic). Then a fault on your grounded computer energizes all the plumbing in the house. A wire out the window to a coathanger is not a ground, it's an antenna, and it's anyone's guess what that'll do for your computer.
What you can consider, which is code-compliant in the US and Canada and a safety benefit, is to have the ungrounded outlets replaced with GFCI receptacles. This does not provide ground but will protect against a lot of what can go wrong. GFCI's come with stickers that say "no equipment ground" that you put on the faceplace when you do this.
If the "site wiring fault" light on your surge suppressor bothers you, put tape over it.
Chip C Toronto
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Are there any down sides to replace all the outlets in one's home with GFCI's? Would refrigerators cause it to trip under normal operations?
Thanks.
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Expense, for one. Nuisance trips, for another.

They can, yes. And that's bad, if you don't catch the problem soon enough.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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A GFCI on a refrigerator is actually considered a human safety threat. Not from electricity. Threat to humans is from food poisoning. The human might not know how long or when the electricity had tripped off.
Bedrooms now must use a different type of GFCI on all wall receptacles. This because fires from things like extension cords have proven to be a more serious threat. My personal recommendation is to put an AFGI on the outlet that lights any live Christmas tree. Others have demonstrated how a Christmas tree fire leaves the occupants less than five minutes to get out.
The downside to GFCIs is nuisance tripping due to electrical appliances that have internal failures - voltage leakages. For example, the 12 volt DC light was isolated from AC mains by a transformer. But the chipmunks exposed one of the 12 volt wires to earth. Periodically the GFCI would trip only because leakage across the transformer was periodically enough to trip that GFCI. Periodic nuisance tripping because the low voltage circuit had a problem that was safe but unacceptable.
snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

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Plese give references for your information. You make some pretty bold statements here which seem to ignore magnitudes and any statistical information other than rationalization.
Pop
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I see nothing 'bold' here. What do you have a problem with? Are you telling us that live Christmas tree fires are not that dangerous? Are you suggesting a GFCI on the refrigerator is acceptable? Are you saying AGFIs are not required on bedroom circuits? Are you saying chipmunks chewing into a 12 VDC wire did not cause those intermittent GFCI trips? What, in very specific detail, do you have a problem with?
Pop wrote:

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