EARTHQUAKE

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On 1/6/2016 10:41 AM, Eagle wrote:

Tornados tend to be highly localized (and, only strike trailer parks! :> ). Hurricanes being much broader in their impact (and, usually flood damage instead of the "percussive" damage from flying stuff)
A friend rode out Andrew ('92) and said it was an interesting experience. I think having to cower in an interior room would sort of defeat the experience... all you'd (hopefully!) experience was noise and some shaking -- wouldn't be able to SEE what was happening.

Supposedly, the New Madrid fault just due south of IL has some potential for significant damage. OTOH, the populations affected, there, aren't what they would be in (anywhere!) Calif.
The idea of the *ground* moving is just fascinating to me! It's one thing to be on a man-made structure and experience motion (Harvard Bridge, Royal Gorge Bridge, tall buildings, etc.); yet another to be on "solid ground" and feel it move!
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Don Y formulated the question :

It IS an interesting experience! I remember a 6.2 shaker in 1970 when the brand new freeway overpass in Northern Los Angeles fell. We were in bed on the second floor when it hit, and I watched our building rock back and forth, bang! bang! and the street rolled like waves for a good 2 minutes. It was fun!
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On 1/6/2016 10:58 AM, Eagle wrote:

The Harvard Bridge (Cambridge-Boston, MA) sort of "floats". When you walk on it, passing traffic causes the bridge to "bounce". So, you have this competing rhythm that screws up your walking pace; instead of "step, step, step" it's "step - boing - step - boing, boing - step". It can be disturbing the first time you encounter it.
The "roadway" of the Royal Gorge Bridge is built of *planks* laid on steel supports. So, when the (occasional, touristy) car drives by, the planks flex and lift you up a bit. As they are only ~10-12 inches wide, you can visibly watch the ripple in the roadway as the car advances past you. At ~1000ft to the river below, you really wish they'd opted to use something other than LUMBER!!
I'd like to be in an open field (away from buildings that might tumble) to experience an earthquake. To be able to *think* about what is happening and "gather data" (observations) to try to rationalize what my body would be feeling. (having to worry about my personal safety would sort of hamper that!)
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Don Y submitted this idea :

I don't think mother nature will satisfy your dream, Don... ^^
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On 1/6/2016 1:11 PM, Eagle wrote:

No, unlikely that I will find myself in a field for ANY reason!
OTOH, I *was* able to realize that the "shaking display" I experienced was the result of an earthquake fast enough to be able to make note of the experience! Folks who were asleep (or driving, etc.) would have missed it entirely!
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Don Y expressed precisely :

No sense waking up for the fast ones...
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On 1/6/2016 11:53 AM, Don Y wrote:

We've had tornadoes, have weakened hurricanes come through, and now we're getting regular earth quakes, too.
--
Maggie

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Muggles presented the following explanation :

Really? Shakers in the midwest are very rair, at least they aren't reported often. That's all you need...a windy and rainy storm with a shaker and a mixer to boot. 8-o
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On 1/7/2016 11:01 AM, Eagle wrote:

We play dodge tornado quite often. When it's the season tracking them street by street can be akin to a sport, even. lol
--
Maggie

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Muggles wrote on 1/7/2016 :

At least you can see a twister coming. You can't 'see' a quake.
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On 1/7/2016 1:47 PM, Eagle wrote:

We can't always see them and have to often rely on the weather reporters or storm chasers for locations. Occasionally, a tv station will be filming live from towers, so we can see when transformers blow up and know about what street they're on.
--
Maggie

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Muggles wrote :

Oh geeeeeez! Watching for blown up transformers to see what street gets hit? 8-o Don't go outside when that happens or you'll be a fried Maggie!
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On 1/7/2016 2:29 PM, Eagle wrote:

We had a small one hit about 3/4 of a mile south from us and take the roofs off a strip mall and some surrounding houses a couple years ago. Another one jumped the river and sent north of us about 3/4 of a mile north of us in the air then came back to the ground and took out a truck stop NE of town.
--
Maggie

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After serious thinking Muggles wrote :

Doesn't shake you up about a twister hitting your home? I think I'd have a BIG room in the house that is twister proof. I'd prolly spend most of our time in that room durring tornado season! Earthquakes don't scare Me, but tornadoes do. :-? Maybe because we live in a earthquake prone area?
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On 2016-01-07 4:23 PM, Eagle wrote:

Earthquakes are rare here, and I would rather keep it that way, there apparently have been some but they didn't affect me at all, only felt one when I lived on the 17th floor of an apartment building many years ago. Tornadoes are also rare, one or two every three of four years within 100 miles or more, living on stable land and with relatively non-violent weather does have its benefits.
--
Froz...

Quando omni flunkus, moritati
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FrozenNorth explained :

That's true. It gets very cold around Rapid City, so I limit My trips there to spring time. I guess living in Southern California's warm weather has Me spoiled. [earthquakes are an afterthought] ^^
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On 1/7/2016 2:23 PM, Eagle wrote:

I think a lot of it has to do with *familiarity* with a risk.
Things with which you have no first-hand experience can conjure up all sorts of nightmarish scenarios, in your imagination. OTOH, practical exposure allows you to more accurately gauge those risks in a REAL context.
Folks who've never encountered a cougar, rattlesnake, tarantula, gila monster, poisonous spider, etc. might cringe at the thought. In practice, you realize they aren't going to CHARGE you but, rather, will shy away -- unless you provoke them! So, instead of thinking that they are "lying in wait" for an unsuspecting "you" to come along, you realize they're going to ignore you -- unless you force them NOT to!
Coming to this realization WITHOUT direct experience is difficult.
Seeing the devastation of a "natural disaster" leaves your imagination unconstrained to IMAGINE what it must have been like. In practice, I suspect the appraisal is very different.
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Don Y was thinking very hard :

Interesting thought. :o)

I'm thinking I wouldn't want to be anywhere NEAR a Grizzly bear!

I'm not sure I would agree with that.

Try living through a BIG tornado, or something like Hurricane Catrina, or an earthquake that does several BILLION dollars in damage and think that Don. :/
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On 1/7/2016 2:56 PM, Eagle wrote:

But most of the consequences of those events are related to how well the support systems addressed the AFTER EFFECTS or failures of man-made structures brought about by the event. E.g., had NOLA been ABOVE sea level, most of the fatalities there would not have occurred. The storm, itself, didn't kill those people; the failure of levees meant to keep the sea water out of the low-lying wards did!
How often do you see *bodies* littering the area of a storm/disaster?
Last year, ~30 people died as a direct result of tornados. Despite all the *power* that they unleashed! 1000 times more people died in the same period due to automobile accidents -- almost the same number as lost their lives to guns! Bundle up the energy expended in all of those car crashes (or gunshots) and compare it to the energy in *one* tornado...
What you *see* in the media is the devastation that these events leave behind. And, *imagine* that the "human cost" must have been tremendous! It is -- but in the *aftermath*, not the event itself!
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On 1/7/2016 3:48 PM, Don Y wrote:

We've had about 6 close calls during tornado season. All we can do is pay attention to where the storms are and what direction they're moving, but when they're coming straight for us you decide just how much you believe in prayer. The best hiding place in a house is a room with no outside walls or windows. We have one tiny coat closet that fits that description and the door doesn't latch tight on it. Probably one small person could squat down in it. The other choice is the bedroom closet, but it's on a west facing wall. The house is built in an L shape and the closet would be located on the inside corner of the L. Me, the hubby, and the dog would fit in that one, but if a strong F5 or F4 tornado hit our house we'd be lucky if there was anything left, but strange things happen and sometimes a twister will take part of a house and not touch something else.
--
Maggie

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