Early 1970's Radarange


I posted a question a couple weeks ago in ragards to a repair I recently made on my Radarange. There was quite a bit of discussion on the safety of these old appliances. Today I'm posting pics of some more "relics" I somehow manage to keep running in my home. Y'all can cringe when you see this! BTW, I don't have any kids, so I don't need to worry about curious young minds sticking their fingers in the fan. Click here: http://p067.ezboard.com/Old-junk/fthebluegrassandcountrymusicforumfrm14.showMessage?topicID 7.topic Bryan
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

hey, that's vintage! kewl.
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http://p067.ezboard.com/Old-junk/fthebluegrassandcountrymusicforumfrm14.showMessage?topicID 7.topic
Some pretty nice stuff...
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http://p067.ezboard.com/Old-junk/fthebluegrassandcountrymusicforumfrm14.showMessage?topicID 7.topic
I like it. An open fan like that can provide hours of entertainment for kids. It did for us and we survived.
The only appliances not worth keeping are energy hogs like refrigerators. Most others are well made and made to last.
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I like it. ?An open fan like that can provide hours of entertainment for kids. ?It did for us and we survived. The only appliances not worth keeping are energy hogs like refrigerators. Most others are well made and made to last.
You're probably right. But I think the GE "monitor-tops" could be the one exception to this rule. Yes, I have one. From what I've read online, their efficiency comes from the fact that the compressor is mounted on top. So any heat that's generated is not passing up through the refrigerator's compartments. Heat rises, so this seems to sense. Also, these refrigerators were built during a period when most families still used ice boxes in their homes. That's certainly reflected in this design. It's insulated in much the same way ice an icebox ....another product of over-engineering! Mine works great, so I have no intentions of getting rid of it. Bryan
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Some information here http://www.antiqueappliances.com/questions.htm
Q. Are these old refrigerators energy efficient?
Yes. During the restoration process, the entire refrigerator is dismantled. All of the old insulation and electrical wiring is removed and discarded. The empty box is then sand blasted, hand sanded, primed and repainted with 6 coats of solvent based enamel paint (your choice of color). Upon reassembly, the refrigerator receives a new blanket of insulation, new electrical wiring and a new door gasket. The mechanical system is overhauled or replaced with a new system, then calibrated and fine tuned to optimum efficiency. Once the refrigerator is completely reassembled, it is turned on and operated on a test pattern for 5 to 7 days. The average run time of a completely restored refrigerator is 10 to 12 minutes every hour. Because these do not have defrost heater assemblies or condenser and evaporator fan systems, they do not require the additional electricity of today's more modern units. The key to their efficiency is the new insulation and a good solid door gasket seal. By keeping the cold air in, the operating time is reduced.
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I like it. ?An open fan like that can provide hours of entertainment for kids. ?It did for us and we survived. The only appliances not worth keeping are energy hogs like refrigerators. Most others are well made and made to last.
You're probably right. But I think the GE "monitor-tops" could be the one exception to this rule. Yes, I have one. From what I've read online, their efficiency comes from the fact that the compressor is mounted on top. So any heat that's generated is not passing up through the refrigerator's compartments. Heat rises, so this seems to sense. Also, these refrigerators were built during a period when most families still used ice boxes in their homes. That's certainly reflected in this design. It's insulated in much the same way as an icebox ....another product of over-engineering! Mine works great, so I have no intentions of getting rid of it. Bryan
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