DWV pipe through studs

I'm using 2" DWV pipe for bathroom/kitchen sinks and vent. I'm in the process of constructing the walls. Can I get by with a 2x6" wall or do I need 2x8"? I will be boring the studs to accommodate the pipe.
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Franz Fripplfrappl
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If they are not load bearing, I see no problem with 2x6. But, I think you're going to find that most fixtures are geared for 1 1/2" fittings so why use 2 inch pipe?
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 13:30:10 +0000, JC wrote:

It's venting to roof. I have 3" to septic, toilet. Using 2" vent.
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Oh, I see.
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Is this legal in your area? Here you must have at least one 3" vent line, secondary vents for additional sinks, toilets, etc. can be 1 1/2" pipe and if they don't tie back into the 3" main vent they must expand to 3" as they exit the roof.
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 11:53:54 -0400, EXT wrote:

Already checked: vent cannot be smaller than 1/2 of pipe. A 2" works just fine with the 3" system.
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There is also typically a requirement that the aggregate vent size be at least as large as the building sewer (main drain). Or sometimes there is the stronger requirement that at least one vent is as large as the building sewer. Just FYI.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 17:53:50 +0000, Wayne Whitney wrote:

Thanks. Already ran this past the building inspector and I'm fine with a 2" vent through roof.
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Ask him if he'd accept an air admittance valve. It'd save you the extra work and roof penetration.
R
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the main vent stack you refer to needs to be 3". But that has nothing to do with running vent pipes in walls. The main stack does not run horizontal through walls.
s

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If the walls are not load bearing, then you can bore a hole up to 60% of the stud depth, which is 3.3" for a 2x6, plenty for 2" DWV.
If a wall is load bearing, then you are restricted to 40%, which is 2.2" for a 2x6, not quite enough for 2" plastic DWV (but OK for 2" copper DWV). However, you can bore a load bearing stud up to 60% if you double the stud, although not for more than two consecutive studs.
Cheers, Wayne
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 14:14:49 +0000, Wayne Whitney wrote:

Good advice. Thanks.
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wrote:

Is this a load bearing wall?
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On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 10:20:31 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

NOT load bearing.
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As Wayne mentioned, the largest hole you can put in a load-bearing stud is 2.2" (40%), or 3.3" (60%) in a non-load-bearing stud. If you double-up the studs, you shouldn't have a problem with 2-1/4" holes (41%) for a short horizontal run. I had to run a 2" drain for our kitchen sink through an exterior 2x6 load-bearing wall under a window to reach the vent/drain off to the side (about three feet run total). My inspector said it was fine.
As for using 2" pipe when 1-1/2" would do, I did it for simplicity. It's easier to pick up a supply of 2" pipe and fittings than to keep an inventory of various sizes on hand. Especially when you're working a long distance from the nearest store. I plumbed my entire house with 2" and 3" drains.
You generally need the equivalent vent as the main drain leaving the building. For instance, if you have a 3" main drain, you need a 3" vent. Of course, you could use three 2" vents to get the same venting as a single 3" vent. On the other hand, if you live in a cold climate, smaller vents can ice over and potentially block the small vent. So 3" vents are often the minimum size in cold climates.
In my case, I wanted to minimize the number of pipes penetrating the roof, both for appearance and the increased potential for leaks. So I installed a single 3" main vent through the roof, and tied all my fixture vents into the one main vent. I have a large 3" trunk line running through the attic, and all my smaller 2" vents tie into that. It meant a little extra pipe, but PVC pipe is fairly inexpensive and the tradeoff was well worth it in my opinion.
Anthony
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franz fripplfrappl wrote:

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Typically the code restricts the boring or notching of studs based on
bearing or non-bearing. Non-bearing allows 60%, bearing - 40%. Note
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