Durability of small screw in flourescents...?

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On Fri, 27 Feb 2009 14:00:48 -0800 (PST), sym

And a reasonable thought it is...
We live in a rural area, and indeed notice power fluctuations. Nothing serious, but we do see it.
Also, we heat geothermally, and have a pump on our well that is the size of a locomotive. When that thing kicks on we see a brief (and slight) dimming of incandescent bulbs. I know that the pump is a huge voltage draw.
It might be possible that those fluctuations in voltage are enough to make the fluorescents unhappy.
Thanks for your comments,
--
Kenneth

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First, I've seen some CFL's that specifically state they are NOT to be mounted with the base up. I presume that is a heat issue. I/ve bought a variety of brands and had pretty good results overall. I have the sprial type in my garage now for several years and none has burned out. At least some of these are the ones you're not supposed to use upside down, but they're still OK anyway. Could be that upside down in the garage they still have lots of airflow and also usually aren't on for hours on end.
The worst results were with some of the ones that look like indoor floods and are in that form factor, not the open spiral type. Many of them failed within a few months. I don't know which ones I have now, but they have lasted for at least a year. Only problem with them is they take a good 2 -3 mins before you get any reasonable amount of light out of them. That's one of my pet peeves. If I could pass a consumer law, it would be that the manufacturer's have to spec how long it will take the bulb to get to say 70% of it's rated output.
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On Fri, 27 Mar 2009 05:14:11 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Howdy,
I don't think that in my situation it is either heat, or orientation.
When I started to notice the problem, I spoke with a technical rep from the manufacturer, and he was fine with the installation we had.
He said that were they in a completely enclosed can, we might have heat trouble, but with the open bottom, he did not see a problem.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Heck, I keep breaking them. Well, my kids do. Several of our lamps have kind of shade that clamps right on the bulb. This worked fine for the familiar old-fashioned bulb-shaped light bulbs, but with the new-fangled flourescents, the wire occasionally gets tangled in the twists of the bulb and it breaks. Annoying and messy.
Mike
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wrote:

Yeah... I know what you mean. If I look at a CFL long enough, I feel the urge to get a Dairy Queen ice cream cone.
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There's mercury in every fluorescent bulb. Instead of repeatedly breaking CFLs, turning your house into a Superfund clean-up site and toying with your families health, you may want to invest in some new lamps/shades so you don't have this problem. http://www.snopes.com/medical/toxins/cfl.asp
R
R
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RicodJour wrote:

The advice in that article sounds to me like a bit of overkill, out of need to be published by those having backsides to cover.
If you break a CFL, picking up the pieces, picking up what's left with masking tape or other sticky tape, and putting them in a sealed bag (much of what the article recommends) should be plenty fine and good. Put the bag of CFL pieces in the trash if that is permitted in your municipality and state.
As for disposal of intact CFLs: In most areas, homeowners and home renters are allowed to dump them in the trash. Meanwhile, check out www.lamprecycle.org for requirements and options. I did hear that Home Depot is accepting dead CFLs for proper disposal. Some universities now have special trash containers designated for dead CFLs for proper disposal of them.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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There are now lightbulb-shaped CFLs, with an outer bulb over the tubing.
The main disadvantage of those is that they start dimmer and take longer to warm up, since the mercury amalgam in those is formulated to work best at the higher temperatures that result in the CFLs with outer bulbs.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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