duct taping exhaust pipes

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I think that some trolling has been going on, but in case the question was for real, the answer is: Repair the duct, screw the pieces together. The duct- in fact any duct- should be mechanically sound before any sealing. Duct tape, as used in the trades, is used on some ducts to overlay a seam, but the seam itself must be tight, entirely closed and sound before applying the duct tape. I've seen inspectors use a pick or knife point to test just that issue.
For a vent pipe, this is even more important. Personally, I've never seen a professionally installed water heater, boiler or furnace vent pipe held together, spliced or even reinforced with duct tape. It'll burn, dry out or fail. Possibly the aluminum "tape" could be used, but even that has an adhesive that would probably fail due to the heat.
You're much better off replacing the bad section of the vent, from the draft hood up. The cost isn't that much and you're going to be a lot safer.
Nonny
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The aluminum tape I put on my water heat flue in 1980 is still performing fine.
cheers Bob
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The proper name for Duct Tape is Duct Insulators Tape. It's original purpose was to hold the canvas in place over the insulation while the Duct Insulators sewed the canvas up thus making the installation more durable. That is why it is a cloth tape that is extremely sticky. It is meant to conform to the canvas used to cover the old style insulation used on ducts back in the day. It was never intended for use directly on ducts. It was certainly never meant for use on gas appliance vent tubing. -- Tom Horne
On Aug 18, 6:21 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

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Sounds dangerous to me. Isn't exhaust pipe leaks where carbon monoxide gets into the house or do water heaters burn so little fuel that it doesn't give off much exhaust?
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no, it's definitely a concern. Most residential water heaters are in the neighborhood of 30-40K BTU or higher IIRC. I would follow the advice already given and screw it together. If it was put together properly in the beginning, the smaller, crimped ends of all the connections should be pointing in the direction of the exhaust flow to minimize the possibility of backdraft, even without sealing the joints. I suppose if you are anal retentive using some muffler cement might work, covered with metal foil tape (as others have said, NOT any other kind of "duct" tape - that would be doomed to a presumably quick, smelly failure.)
nate
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N8N wrote:

My understanding is that the crimped ends should be pointed down to contain condensation within the pipe instead of letting it drip out at the joints. This is important for wood stoves.
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On 8/18/2010 10:01 AM, Bob F wrote:

Thanks all for replies. Once I read them all, I realized that screwing them together is what I wanted to do. If they are not together in a convincing way (screws are very convincing), there is definitely a CO exposure you don't want to have in the place where you hang out to prepare your meals. (Yes, here in New Mexico, many of us have water heaters in our kitchens.)
So here's how it went down:
1) Refrain from using hot water for a half hour so that ducts won't be hot. 2) Duct tape up the back of this joint so it stays together for the next 5 minutes. 3) Use an 1-1/4 screw to make a penetration right on the knuckle. When you get through the top, stop. 4) Use drill bit to prepare hole for screw. 5) Install screw. 6) Remove duct tape. 7) Thank the nice folks on usenet who helped me out here.
I think I'll foil tape it for good measure. Cheers,
--
Uno

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On 8/18/2010 6:54 PM, Uno wrote:

ps I used a different screw for the fastening: a little, metal duct screw.
--
Uno

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