Drywalling Master Bedroom


Hi;
I am getting ready to move back into my home after being overseas for a few years. In1985 the house had a master bedroom addition that is quite beautiful. However, the original owner evidently cut corners on the drywall. There are several blisters appearing. There are also rust spots and waves in the ceiling. It was put up with nails and many have came loose. There are also previous repair attempts where you can see the joint compound built up from the panels,and then painted over.
I am wondering about the best way to fix this. The good thing is the house will be empty while I work. I am very seriously considering gutting all the drywall and starting over from scratch. I am very confident that I can do the rough install and I will use screws, not nails.
I am worried about the finishing taping and mudding. I dont want any cracks to appear 6 months later. I am wondering if I would be better off having it done by a pro.
I am curious if there are any profesional tools that I could rent. What I would really like, is someway to spray drywall mud on the walls and have a smooth surface that I could paint. I dont want any texture look. If this type of thing is available, I could just peel off the blisters, and install screws all over the place and spray the mud. I guess what I would be looking for is like a veneer of mud 1/8 inch thick over everything.
Any advice or reccomendations would be appreciated Pat
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Pat,
To me the real test of how professional a sheetrocker is can be determined by a nice smooth finish. Smooth is the hardest of all finishes. Think of it this way... when something is smooth any break in that is noticeable. If smooth is what you want get out your phone book and get some bids or call your friends for suggestions on tradesmen.
I have rentals and do a lot of work myself. I do a finish that is a modified "knock down". This hides my weaknesses in finishing. The sheetrock is hung well. Taping and mudding takes some time to get a good technique but can be done. But then all the sheetrock should have a skim coat and then be sanded and another coat, etc. This is what gives the smooth nice look you want. In my rentals I don't have the time, or the skill, to do smooth; so I usually have a slight texture.
I am pleased with my skills and the jobs I have done over the last thirty years, but to be truthful, I usually don't need smooth.
IF you decide to try it... you didn't say how high your ceilings are... mine are 9.5'. So I rent a sheetrock lifter. It really helps me. I use it on ceilings and have used it on some walls. To cut down on seams, I'd layout the job with the largest sheets of sheetrock that will work. So instead of 4 x 8, I'd get 4 x 12, etc. Every seam that doesn't have to be there is one more smooth place on the wall that doesn't need mudding. You didn't say anything about your ceiling joists or studs, but if they are out of square/alignment that can also affect the look you seek. Other tools are not too expensive: trowels, utility knife, sheetrock square/straight edge, electric drill to screw in screws, chalkline for marking studs, keyhole saw to cut out areas around outlets, tape measure, and if you decide to texture there are hoppers for spraying mud onto the walls to give texture.
And lastly the blistering should be investigated. That is not normal. Rust would indicate to me moisture. Perhaps you have a leak in the roof? Is there a floor above this room? Perhaps plumbing... water is sneaky and can travel a long way from where the problem is. I once had ants in a rental. The next made the ceiling soft and it all had to be redone. Animals, like squirrels, mice, birds, etc. can also cause moisture that can cause problems on sheetrock.
If your house is empty, be sure to keep it warm now that we are entering the colder months. It will help to keep your materials dry and not damp-ish and will protect the unused home from issues that can arise from lack of use. One other thing... as an older woman, I don't have the strength that many a young fella has, so I opt for "slight of hand tricks", if you will. I do things differently than some may expect. I have hung sheetrock horizontally instead of upright. If the ceiling is eight feet or less you have just the ceiling and center seam on each wall. And the seam is right where you can work it. Most furniture is three or four feet high and when in the room and next to the wall you rarely notice the seam. So my walls look quite nice. Besides if you're looking for seams you are probably looking vertically and you rarely see mine running that direction. Good luck. ____________
KaCe
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Thanks for the reply, I found it quite informative. My ceilings are 8 foot, but I also have a vaulted skylight in the Master Bedroom and in the Master Bath. The blistering of the tape is in the Master Bath. So moisture is a constant from the shower steam.
I had saw in the newsgroup about paintable wallpaper. That maybe my best option. I could probably screw everything in place, and put a couple thin coats of mud and then the paper. Then paint.
If you are interested and have the time, I could email you some pics so you will see what I am talking about.
Thanks Again Pat
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komobu wrote:

If you're going to wallpaper, why sheetrock? Remember, wallpaper was originally glued to cheesecloth attached to furring strips.
I'd use cheap paneling. Much easier to work with than sheetrock.
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If you have enough steam and moisture in the bathroom to blister the tape and bed, you better spend more of your money on venting. Hard plaster can take that kind of moisture better for a while, but it too can fail.
If your master bedroom is in good repair other than finish type problems, hire a good taper. He (boy, is that sexist-might be a woman) can make the walls smooth, but then, so can you with enough time and talent. You might be able to find someone to do veneer plaster in your area, it can be skimmed on top of what you have. Venetian plaster is all the rage, but probably pricey.
______________________________ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Had a house built in the northeast a stones throw from Canada. Guys built and rocked it. When it came time to mudd & tape, they brought in a crew of French Canadian women. They never even brought anything that resembled sanding equipment. Those walls never showed any sign of seams or screws in the 17 yrs I lived there. And during that time there were two rare minor earthquakes.
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Well, once you get the drywall all right, you can always put a skim coat of mud on there. Dilute it a little, and roll it on with a paint roller, then take it off with a large taping knife (12" or so).
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