drywall which got wet

Page 1 of 2  
Due to a leaky shower stall ( since replaced) some of the nearby drywall now has a 'puffy' look. I guess the paper coating has expanded or sumthin'. Can I lightly sand it and paint over it? What would you suggest? Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mypacks.net wrote:

Not much can be done (satisfactorily at least) w/ drywall that has been wet other than replace it.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/10/2009 4:07 PM dpb spake thus:
>

I second that emotion.
Replacement isn't too terribly traumatic, depending, of course, on your skill level and sense of adventure. Just a few tools (measuring tape, straightedge, utility knife, hammer or screwdriving drill, drywall finishing tools), some "mud" and you're good to go.
--
Made From Pears: Pretty good chance that the product is at least
mostly pears.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, depends on how wet for how long.
If the drywall is breaking up, replacement is the only sensible option.
But if the water damage is minor/cosmetic, a simpler fix might be very viable. Sand and then seal the area with an oil based primer (Kilz or similar). Then paint.
It's worked perfectly for me a couple of times. Those repairs are completely invisible and they were made several years ago.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mypacks.net wrote:

Yes, you can lightly sand it and paint over it. If that is what you want to do rather than repairing it properly and can live with the results.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depends on if you're married...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it is spongey to the touch and the paper has seperated from the drywall , getting it "wet" again by painting it will make the paper bubble up and the drywall possibly crumble...Without photos only you know how bad it is...Good luck...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How bad is it? If really bad, will have to be replaced but that's not as hard as it sounds.
If just a bit bubbled (can barely feel it) let it completely dry then consider possibly putting a 'bathroom type' (vinyl sort of) wall paper over it after sanding smooth *lightly* through any bubbled paint. It will have to be very minimal damage or the wallpaper will bubble and not adhere, or you'll see imperfections through the paper.
Don't use the standard 'paper' but stuff meant for bathrooms. it's a bit thicker and can handle a reasonable dampness load. Also it's washable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/10/2009 11:49 PM cshenk spake thus:

Don't know where you got "a bit thicker"; it isn't. It ("green" drywall) is the same thickness, but is moisture resistant. Also not washable, though it will be after being primed and painted with washable paint.
--
Made From Pears: Pretty good chance that the product is at least
mostly pears.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 17:34:48 -0800, David Nebenzahl

I think he was talking about wallPAPER.
In which case, you want to use SOLID VINYL wall covering. (or mylar foil)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/11/2009 5:04 PM snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca spake thus:

>

Oopsies. 20 lashes with a wet noodle for me.
--
Made From Pears: Pretty good chance that the product is at least
mostly pears.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This was specifically a comment on wallpaper.

Yup! But it's 'she' (not that ya can tell by the nickname here!).

Not familiar with mylar foil but the vinyl yes. Thats what I'm used to seeing recommended for bathrooms.
I got the impression the 'wall' he was talking about wasnt one that would normally be in a direct line of spray, and was only gotten wet due to the plumming accident, hence the suggestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 10, 6:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@mypacks.net wrote:

If there is no tile on it then ripping out a patch of drywall to the studs and replacing it is just as easy as sanding it IMHO. Cut the bad drywall out to the nearest stud centers, screw on a patch, mud/ tape it, sand, paint. Mold is a living organism and will only multiply over time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cement board is what you want in wet areas. The greenboard was used there for a while, but it doesn't work much better than plain wallboard. Use the greenboard in the _rest_ of the bathroom to fight steamy air, and use cement board in the shower and around the tub.
With cement board, you tape the seams with mortar and fiberglass tape.
I recommend you put a waterproof membrane behind the cement board.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/11/2009 3:13 PM SteveBell spake thus:

But how do you finish the cement board for paint (assuming no tile over it)? Seems as though that would be even more work than just putting the stuff up.
--
Made From Pears: Pretty good chance that the product is at least
mostly pears.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Wrong.
Wrong.
Wrong.
Greenboard is made for *damp* areas, not wet. Blueboard shouldn't be anywhere near water.
And greenboard hasn't been code-approved for use in shower enclosures for several years, at least, because it supports the growth of mold.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@mypacks.net wrote in

If you insist on only sanding and painting over it, prime with oil base primer. This will keep the paper from getting wet and bubbling further when it gets wet again from painting/mudding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Red Green" wrote

Question, have you had much luck putting latex over oil based primer? I ask because my Mom taught me that's bad juju. Pretty much put oil over oil. It was a bear when we had to paint a chair rail and window setup that was oil based before and we needed to put latex over it. Had to sand the dickens out of it to make it work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely. In one place I got there was a bathroom that was painted over wallpaper with latex. The paper had bubbled.
Remove loose stuff. Oil prime areas to be mudded/patched (water in mud will further     bubbling of wallpaper). Mudd and smooth Prime everything with oil base. Paint with latex.
Worked like a charm...whether it's suppose to or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/12/2009 10:10 AM cshenk spake thus:

I have. It works fine. (Assuming you use a good paint over a good primer.) Remember that the primer finish is very flat, which gives a good "tooth" for subsequent coats to adhere to.
I also know a professional house painter who does that (oil primer/latex topcoat). And he knows a *hell* of a lot more about paint than me.

Are you sure the oil-based paint you were painting over wasn't primer but was glossy or semi-gloss? You're going to have problems painting over *any* type of non-flat previous coat; that's why you're supposed to use a deglosser (or scuff the finish) first.
--
Made From Pears: Pretty good chance that the product is at least
mostly pears.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.