drywall to wood transition


What's the normal drywall to wood transition done with? By that I mean when drywall finishes/ends at a wood beam for instance so that you have ehhh I'll have to go with a picture this is too complicated to describe
http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/houseideas/websize/P3230097.JPG
http://photos.imageevent.com/eigenvector/houseideas/websize/P3230098.JPG
Bad drywalling aside, where drywall ends and wood begins how is it normally transitioned? I'm thinking corner trim moulding, but are there other alternatives?
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Eigenvector wrote:

Plastic "J" bead is commonly used as a finish cap on a drywall edge, be it exposed or butted against another material. It's paintable to match the drywall.
Pete C.
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Oh you mean an endcap that goes over the drywall. I hadn't thought of that.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Google "drywall beads". You'll find all sorts of varieties for different applications.
R
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| Eigenvector wrote: | > | > What's the normal drywall to wood transition done with? | | Google "drywall beads". You'll find all sorts of varieties for | different applications. | | R |
what ...............no link what the heck Retardo you must be slippin why answer with the obvious search term? it is senseless.................just like you.
to the OP j-bead is what you want http://www.trim-tex.com/catalog/jbeads.htm
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Yeah the more I think about it the more obvious that solution becomes. Basically its an end cap for the drywall sheet to prevent the drywall from crumbling with age or absorbing water from the air. It's actually even nicer because it helps hold the drywall together when you have to put screws into it close to the edge. Normally that isn't a problem when you have two sheets butted up against each other, the tape and the mud will keep it intact. But on the outside edge you don't have anything to keep it from pushing out/buckling under the screw. The J channel would give it some structure and keep the drywall protected.
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