Drywall Technique

Howdy,
I recently did my first drywall job. If I had to give myself a grade it would be a C. I initially screwed up --- BIG. Way to much mud for the first coat. I had to sand it down. I did the second and third coat and thought I was doing fine... but, when I was done was able to wire the room lighting I realized my first crack at drywalling did not go so well.
I realized I should have had stronger lighting in the first place so that the imperfections would be more visible.
How thin of a coat are you suppose to apply.. feathered for each application of mud? I was trying to do that I felt I was applying too much pressure with the 12" taping knife. Geez, my hand was hurting. Any advice you can give me would be great!
Happy Holidays!
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I'm no expert on mudding, but I found like you, that good lighting helps prevent a lot of "geez, that stinks" later on I also found that there really isn't such a thing as too much mud, you can always sand away the mud and get'er back to good, better too much mud that you have to waste time sanding down than not enough mud in the first place. as you practice you'll be able to tell when your laying it on too thick. but better to err on the side of more than less, its hard to feather out a taped joint with paint on the walls already
Dave

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and better to press too hard than too little...
randy

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Exactly opposite of my experience. I always plan on several coats letting them dry well between applications. Never find that it is easier to sand than it is to get smooth coat of mud. That is especially so with vinyl. It is easier to fill in with subsequent coats. I have done many remodels feathering to painted walls where no one could find the transition when finished. Just take your time and enjoy the process! -Dan

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This might help;
don't try to pressure the entire blade. Reach a finger or two as far out on the hard back as possible and literally bend the edge of the blade where it meets the drywall surface. I think you will soon get the idea.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Ok, so your first try sucks. The big question is: Have you painted it yet? If not, it's fixable with some warm water and a big sponge.
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I'm not an expert but I have been mudding since I was ten and have done dozens of houses.
0) TWICE AS MUCH LIGHT AS WILL BE IN THE ROOM.
1) On the first coat I apply just enough mud to cover the seam tape, I do not worry about tapering the edges. I also typically use a drywall compound called sheetrock 90, that will dry in 90 minutes and is sandable. 2) Once dry I run around the room with the drywall trowel and give all the high spots or bumps a quick scrape off, NO SANDING 3) I apply my second coat of mud filling in low area's and tapering the edges of all the seams. 4) I sand very, very quickly. 5) I wipe all the walls with a damp cloth to remove dust. 6) I apply my final coat of mud, cleaning my trowel every couple of minutes. A clean trowel makes the cleanest job.
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Geez, my hand was hurting.

I'm not an expert at drywall, but I can suggest some exercises to keep your wrist and hand in shape ;)
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