Drywall sizes

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I picked up the wrong size drywall at the store, it wasn't a big deal since I was just trying to get a remnant so I could patch holes in my wall. It was like 2 bucks for a 3/4 sheet.
But anyway I happened to get 3/8" drywall. What size is typically used where? My bedrooms are 1/2" drywall, my basement looks to be 5/8", as does my garage. So where would 3/8" typically be used?
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Eigenvector wrote:

3/8" is used where cost is the major concern or where you are matching that thickness. Mobile homes and manufactured homes come to mind.
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Well, I've got a problem... Speaking of Drywall. I tried to remove the overhead fan in the bathroom, and although I knew the hole would have to be enlarged to replace it, in the process of pulling the fan down from the ceiling, I tore a rather large hole in the sheetrock.
After repairing my mess, I will need a square hole 7-1/4 X 7-1/4 (once IΉm done) and can place the new fan into that opening. The opening now is torn sheetrock and larger than my required dimension.... Approx 10² X 8² or so ... ....
The job is overhead, IΉm not very experienced with sheetrock repair, and especially not with repairing a hole with a hole (square) left in it ...
HELP Guys ....
IΉve got a contract to sell the house, and this is an action item on the inspection list.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Jack Lenexa, Kansas 66215
On 8/30/06 7:39 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, "Lawrence"

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<HTML> <HEAD> <TITLE>Re: Drywall sizes</TITLE></HEAD> <BODY> <FONT FACE="Verdana">Well, I've got a problem... Speaking of Drywall. &nbsp;I &nbsp;tried to remove the overhead fan in the bathroom, and although I knew the hole would have to be enlarged to replace it, in the process of pulling the fan down from the ceiling, &nbsp;I tore a rather large hole in the sheetrock. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR> <BR> After repairing my mess, I will need a square hole 7-1/4 X 7-1/4 &nbsp;(once I&#8217;m done) and can place the new fan into that opening. &nbsp;The opening now is torn sheetrock and larger than my required dimension.... Approx 10&#8221; X &nbsp;8&#8221; or so ... ....<BR> <BR> The job is overhead, I&#8217;m not very experienced with sheetrock repair, and especially not with repairing a hole with a hole (square) left in it ...<BR> <BR> HELP Guys ....<BR> <BR> I&#8217;ve got a contract to sell the house, and this is an action item on the inspection list.<BR> <BR> Any help would be greatly appreciated.<BR> <BR> Thanks<BR> <BR> <FONT SIZE="2">Jack <BR> Lenexa, Kansas 66215<BR> </FONT><BR> On 8/30/06 7:39 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com, &quot;Lawrence&quot; &lt; snipped-for-privacy@paulbunyan.net&gt; wrote:<BR> <BR> <FONT COLOR="#0000FF">&gt; <BR> &gt; Eigenvector wrote:<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR="#008000">&gt;&gt; I picked up the wrong size drywall at the store, it wasn't a big deal since<BR> &gt;&gt; I was just trying to get a remnant so I could patch holes in my wall. &nbsp;It<BR> &gt;&gt; was like 2 bucks for a 3/4 sheet.<BR> &gt;&gt; <BR> &gt;&gt; But anyway I happened to get 3/8&quot; drywall. &nbsp;What size is typically used<BR> &gt;&gt; where? &nbsp;My bedrooms are 1/2&quot; drywall, my basement looks to be 5/8&quot;, as does<BR> &gt;&gt; my garage. &nbsp;So where would 3/8&quot; typically be used?<BR> </FONT><FONT COLOR="#0000FF">&gt; <BR>&gt; 3/8&quot; is used where cost is the major concern or where you are matching<BR> &gt; that thickness. &nbsp;Mobile homes and manufactured homes come to mind.<BR> &gt; <BR> </FONT></FONT> </BODY> </HTML>
--B_3239816227_487464--
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Re: Drywall sizes
Well, I've got a problem... Speaking of Drywall. I tried to remove the overhead fan in the bathroom, and although I knew the hole would have to be enlarged to replace it, in the process of pulling the fan down from the ceiling, I tore a rather large hole in the sheetrock.
After repairing my mess, I will need a square hole 7-1/4 X 7-1/4 (once I'm done) and can place the new fan into that opening. The opening now is torn sheetrock and larger than my required dimension.... Approx 10" X 8" or so ... ....
The job is overhead, I'm not very experienced with sheetrock repair, and especially not with repairing a hole with a hole (square) left in it ...
HELP Guys ....
I've got a contract to sell the house, and this is an action item on the inspection list.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks \\\\
screw some wood on opposite edges of the hole to screw your patch into. You can use scraps of plywood or 1x3 (I like at least 3" wide to geve me plenty of room to screw into). Then take your time and mud and tape the joints. You are better off using many thin coats of mud and slowly level it out than to try to do it all in only 2 or 3 coats, expecially being inexperienced.
Mike D.
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Mike Dobony wrote:

medallions like these: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)Ξiling+medallion&page=1> if you can find one that goes with the decor of the room.
--
Grandpa

What is that dripping from my fingers?
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Eigenvector wrote:

3/8" is used where cost is the major concern or where you are matching that thickness. Mobile homes and manufactured homes come to mind.
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basement until I can figure out what I want to do down there.
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In most cases, 5/8" is needed for fire codes. I used the 3/8" in my detached garage since it did not have to meet any code and it was lighter for me to handle by myself.
It may be allowed on some partition half walls that do not act as fire barriers, but don't take my word on that.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Interior walls = 1/2" Exterior walls and ceilings = 5/8" Radius walls and other curved applications require 2 layers of either 1/4" or 3/8" or a combination of the two.
3/8" is also used to overlay a layer of sheetrock that has been damaged, or has a texture that is difficult to remove. It has other uses, but these are the basics.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Eigenvector wrote:

Nowhere. Do yourself the favor and write off the $2 to experience.
-or-
Spend some extra time and effort to shim out the area to be patched 1/8" so the surfaces align.
R
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Of course. That's why they manufactur it. (The morons always come out of the woodwork, somehow.)
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jeffc wrote:

In the course of normal construction 3/8" drywall is very seldom used.
As an experienced DIY & structural researcher I have used many units of 1/2 & 5/8 drywall.
In 35 years I have bought 2 sheets of 3/8; used one, tossed one.
Unless you need to drywall a curved surface or cover a really messed up ceiling 3/8 isn't much use.
For wall or ceiling drywall over framing 3/8 is too thin. For repair of some plaster walls (~7/8") 1/2 & 3/8 together might be a pretty good solution.
But for everyday work the 3/8 usually stays at the lumber yard......that's why my second sheet was tossed.....kept it long enough that is become unusable.
cheers Bob
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In other words, not "nowhere".
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jeffc wrote:

Semantics. I'm not in the habit of qualifying everything I say to cover every possible situation, but in this case the term nowhere was only a small stretch from fact. The drywall manufacturer's make it and sell it, so it is being used, but for the life of me I don't recall ever seeing anyone use it. There's little point.
3/8" is the bastard son of drywall. If you're doing residential curved surfaces either wetting 1/2" or using two layers of 1/4" work the best and doen't require futzing to make the curved sheet surfaces align with the adjoining 1/2" board.
3/8" creates more problems then it solves and is invariably used by a DIYer who is trying to save money (like it really saves any appreciable amount of money).
R
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wrote:

It's a good choice for a second layer over a normal ceiling when you're trying for a bit of noise reduction.
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Goedjn wrote:

An inefficient way of trying to achieve noise reduction. Either suspend something stiffer like 1/2" drywall on resilient channel or use a sound deadening board covered with thicker drywall that won't sag.
Unless you're willing to live with the 3/8" sagging or willing to put in double the amount of screws - assuming it's a plaster on lath ceiling - it's a poor choice for a ceiling. Or you could use joint compound to glue it to the ceiling, but if you're going to glue it 1/4" is fine still cheaper and lighter than the 3/8".
3/8" drywall is still a bastard son of quality construction. 3/8" drywall has far more drawbacks than the meager cost and weight savings are worth.
R
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You're just in the habit of spending 15 minutes qualifying it later. It's not semantics. You made a smartass reply and got caught.
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jeffc wrote:

WTF are you on about? There was no smartass reply. Let me rephrase it so it's clear. I have never seen a professional use 3/8" sheetrock in my 30 years in the business, both commercial and residential. The only couple of times I've seen the stuff used was by a DIYer who was obviously trying to save money and ended up fucking up the project.
It's not worth the effort to try to make something the wrong thickness fit. If you're trying to match to an existing thicker plaster wall, it's easier, cheaper and faster to rip some plywood strips and furr out the framing. It's not worth using an unsuitably flexible product for ceiling applications due to the extra labor involved in installing it so it won't sag. It is not flexible enough to do tight radii - two layers of 1/4" is superior. 1/2" drywall is the bare minimum thickness for wall strength.
Tell me the advantages of 3/8" again. What? A buck a board cheaper? Yeah, I'll be able to retire on those savings...*
R
* For future reference, that was a smartass reply. :)
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lol. Like something in the frig. Don't want to eat it. Don't want to waste and throw away. When it becomes unusable (aka rotten), no issues tossinmg it:-)
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3/8" might be used where the wall needs to be curved, or some other area that is decorative and doesn't need strength. But since it can't be "lined up" with other width drywall, it's usually not worth it if the only reason is to save money or weight.
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