Drywall screws

For now I prefer using drywall screws for securing drywall to the studs. I'm not proficient enough with a hammer to not beat the crap out of the nail or drywall. But the only thing I've seen that causes a problem with drywall screws is their tendency to push through the paper and dig into or through the drywall.
I guess my question, is this more of a matter of practice/technique than a weakness of using screws? I can usually minimize the digging in by controlling how fast the screw is inserted as I get closer to the flush point, but that doesn't press the drywall tightly against the studs. I almost want to use a washer to halt the screw's tendency to punch through the paper.
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Eigenvector wrote:

You can get attachments that will do it for you or buy a special dry wall tool that will even feed the screws for you. However it sounds like you don't do enough to make either worth while, maybe you can rent on.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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Eigenvector wrote:

This is one of those places where a cheap tool replaces a lot of trial and error. Try one of these:
http://www.vermontamerican.com/products/productdetail.htm?G 1451&GRP1451&Ir221
and your tear-through problems should be a thing of the past. There are even cheaper tools which seem similar but this one has the advantage of a clutch which releases when the screw head is at the right depth making errors nearly impossible.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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http://www.vermontamerican.com/products/productdetail.htm?G 1451&GRP1451&Ir221
God, are you guys telling me that this time it ISN'T necessarily my poor technique? Hang on a sec I think I stepped into an alternate dimension...
No I'm not a drywall hanger, this is just you know those onesy twosy things that homeowners have to do - but that there was tool to do this never entered my mind. Thanks that makes me feel a lot better.
Since I won't be doing this all that much it's probably best for me to just learn how to do it without the tool, no need to spend money on yet another tool I'll only use once in a blue moon - although that VA tool is looking pretty nifty.
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I use drywall screws for LOTS of things. I would think this tool would be generally useful.. Has anybody used it on say, something like attaching thin plywood to studs, etc.??
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wrote:

Drywall screws are weak and brittle for work other than drywall. With most of them Made in China or Taiwan the quality is even worse. Wood screws are stronger than drywall screws.
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professorpaul wrote:

Probably not much good for anything besides drywall. Normally one is not screwing down material which is so delicate as the paper layer on drywall and close enough is, well, close enough. But it sure makes life a lot easier for a klutz like me when doing a remodel. Not nearly so clever as one of the screw shooter guns that the pros use but at something like $200 cheaper this little gadget chucked up in my DeWalt cordless is close to a miracle.
But as someone else posted, drywall screws are really terrible for general purpose use and almost anything else would do a better job and be stronger.
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John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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Can you come up with two bucks: http://www3.shopping.com/xPF-Vermont_American_Tool_Company_Vermont_American_No_16622_Dry_Scr_Setter
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It is YOUR poor technique -- it is just that the industry has come up with a tool to help people with poor technique due a quality job.
As long as you have the feel for it, I have never had a problem driving drywall screws perfectly with a cordless screwdriver.
My god, it's not rocket science! just go as slow as you need to make sure it goes in only the right depth.
Now driving them right takes time since you can't just slam them in which is why professionals use screw guns -- so they can go full speed with auto-loading and still get it right.
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On Sat, 9 Sep 2006 13:25:54 -0700, "Eigenvector"

With a little practice you'll get the proper depth. They need to outlaw nails in drywall due to nail pops.
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There are actual drywall screwdrivers that look and act much like a drill with a screwdriver bit, the only real difference is that to engage the chuck on a drywall screwdriver, one must push on the unit. Let go & it stops spinning the screw.
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A drywall screw gun is worth the expense. I picked up a Dewalt model from HD for around $75. It never once ripped the paper. You set the depth to set the screw, hit the button, and it's done.
It is also very effective at driving a screw through your finger, which hurts a lot.
-rev
Eigenvector wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

Push the drywall tight to the stud with your free hand *before* the screw contacts the stud.
Do not rely on the screw to pull the drywall to the stud. If you do, the screw can easily pull through the paper while trying to pull the drywall to the stud.
Use a drill/driver with and adjustable clutch.
When the drywall is pressed tight to the stud *before* the screw is being driven ... it becomes a timing issue. Practice makes perfect.
If the drill/driver has two speed ranges use the slower speed ... its easier for for us non pro drywall hangers.
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another consideration, in addition to those already listed, drywall screws are available with fine threads and coarse threads
seems the fine thread ones offer more reaction time than the coarse thread ones to stop the drill or whatever your installing them with, so using fine thread screws might help
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Fine thread drywall screws are for commercial use, because the buildings are usually made with thin steel beams as the studs. Coarse thread screws are for household use, because homes are made of wood studs.
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Sound logical, but what do you use when metal studs are used in a house?
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