drywall screw spins out

I tried to hang drywall on metal studs using fine thread drywall screws (for metal studs that I got from HD) over the weekend. Everything went OK except for one section of the drywall over one stud. What happens is that the screws get to tight and then spin out before dimpling. The screw heads are not even flush with the drywall surface (still sticking out a little) when spin out occurs. I usually use a dimpler bit, but even with a regular screw driver, I couldn't drive the screws after a certain point to get the dimple. Any suggestions? As I mentioned, I didn't have a problem with most of the job.
Thanks, Matt
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Put in a shorter screw.

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hit it with a hammer just enough to counter sink and you are good to go.

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If they all happen in one area, it's likely that there's something inside stopping the screws from going in any further.

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Actually no, I can see the screws going thru the metal. I only need about 1/16 - 1/8" to get the dimple, but they spin out before then. They are 1-1/4" screws; I'll try shorter ones..
Thanks.
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If you looked at a cross section of the metal beams, are the corners perfectly square, or do they sort of fold back a bit toward the interior (probably not explaining that well....sorry)?
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Doug, that's one of the first things I checked, and as far as I could see the metal stud seemed to be square. When the screw was in, there were no gaps left between the drywall and the lower edge(or face?) of the stud. I will check again tonight. That might definitely cause this problem.
Thanks.
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I'm wondering if maybe the beams have a curved edge which feels like it's flat as you begin to put the screw in. The screw goes in part of the way, and a wall of metal rubs against the threads or something. Maybe drill a 1/8" hole, strip a piece of #14 wire, feed it into one of the holes, and see if you can feel anything odd in there. Maybe all you need to do is put the screws in 1/4" further to one side or the other, thereby avoiding whatever demons are in there.
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I tried to put screws at different locations (on the same stud which is about 9 ft.), and had the same problem...
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In that case, the only remaining possibility is that you're just a bad person.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What exactly are you driving the screws with and at what speed? Are you using a torque setting to control the depth or a depth stop?
If you're only having problems with the one stud, it points to something with that stud - maybe a lighter guage?
R
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RicodJour, I got these studs from HD at different times. I don't know what gauge they are, but it might be possible that one batch is lighter gauge than the others. Assuming this particular one is lighter, what should I do? A different screw maybe?
Thanks, Matt
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Maybe, but if it's stripping out with a fine threaded drywall screw meant for steel studs, I don't know what else would hold better. Are you using the self-drilling screws or the pointy ones?
I'd probably cut a couple or three holes big enough for me to get my arm in (saving the pieces) and insert some scraps of plywood/wood behind the stud flange to give the screw something to bite into, then attach some plywood scraps to the edges of the holes I cut so the piece that was cut out could be screwed back in place. Tape & spackle.
It's not really a big deal. A little bit more work but that's what you've got. Obviously you won't want to hang anything heavy off of those studs without reinforcing them and/or the drywall.
R
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The drywall screws should be the type with a sharp point, and not the ones with a drill bit looking point. Within the lot of screws, is there any chance some of the screws look different regarding how high the threading goes (how close to the head)?
bill

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I'm sure I have the right screws - with the sharp point; I have used them for other projects as well.
I also tried what RicodJour suggested (I still have access to the stud so I didn't have to cut anything). I placed a piece of wood behind the stud flange, and used coarse grade drywall screw. There was no spin out, but I couldn't drive it deep enough (either with the drill or with the screwdriver) to make a dimple. It is as if the drywall is really hard there.
Anyway I'm going to try to create a dimple probably with a hammer first, and then see what happens..
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Don't. There's something weird there. If you're screwing into the wood backing, and it's reasonably thick wood (not a paint stirrer), then you should be able to drive the screw right through the drywall with no problem. If it was a plaster wall you'd still be able to sink the screw and drywall is nowhere near as hard as plaster.
You switched to coarse drywall screws with the wood backing, which shows you understand how it's supposed to work. Don't start trying to set screws in metal studs with a hammer, even if they have wood backing. You'll get pops and end up having to patch and paint.
The tapered edge of the drywall is denser and harder due to the rolling process that tapers it, but that should not prevent the screw from sinking correctly. I don't know what exactly you're doing, but it's very unlikely that the problem is too hard drywall.
R
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(for metal studs that I got from HD) over the weekend. Everything went OK except for one section of the drywall over one stud. What happens is that the screws get to tight and then spin out before dimpling. The screw heads are not even flush with the drywall surface (still sticking out a little) when spin out occurs. I usually use a dimpler bit, but even with a regular screw driver, I couldn't drive the screws after a certain point to get the dimple. Any suggestions? As I mentioned, I didn't have a problem with most of the job. <<<<<<<
How much drywall are you putting up?
If it's a small amount, just push harder on the drill/driver so that the screw threads do not have to do ALL the work of drawing the screw head into the drywall.

weak & the threads strip out before pulling the head flush. Pushing harder will help the screws do their job.
IMO the coarse screws that you're trying to drive thru the steel into wood might be binding up when their minor diameter gets stuck in the steel stud.
cheers Bob
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It's not on the tapered edge, but very near. I actually had to screw on the other tapered edge, and there were no problems. I put up 3 sheets so far, and all went smoothly except this one stud. I'm not going to hammer the screw into the stud, but try to create a dimple somehow without damaging the paper.
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