Drywall & On-Center

I'm looking to finish my basement, most of the framing is already done. I started to research about hanging drywall, and purchasing tools. Some sites and books I have read talk about xxx inches "on center". No site really defines what "on center" means to a newb like me. I really could use a picture or a detailed explaination of what it means. Thanks.
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Kbalz wrote:

OC means distance between the center of stud to stud on the frame. Typically 16 inches. Basement wall frame is usually floating type. If a wall can be multiple of 16 inches, that is best. I always had my house built with that in mind. I guess insulation is going behind the drywall with vapor barrier.
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Tony, that is exactly what I thought it was, I just wanted confirmation.
I also just saw a picture when attaching dry wall directly to studs.. and if two butt joints share a stud's width, won't the nails / screws attaching the drywall to the stud be too close to the edge of the dry wall and break it?? Or is there enough room usually?
I do not plan on putting in strapping / furring. But for things that 'stick out' like venting / hvac, and water pipes.. do I just use wood to close them up, then drywall over the wood? These things aren't discussed in the book I purcahsed.
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Kbalz wrote: ...

And, of course, that's the same thing as edges except the centerline measurement means don't have to keep track of which edge goes on the line (which is why it's used instead).

Generally, if accurate it's fine. "Trick" is to start the screw a slight distance back from the end and angle it into the stud slightly to gain a little extra distance.
For neophytes, hanging the 'rock vertically to avoid butt joints (if wall is too long or space into basement too awkward for full-length sheets) can be worthwhile as most can finish a preformed edge joint far easier than a butt joint.
...

You'll want to either frame neatly around them or depending on the geometry perhaps simply move a wall inward to accommodate them. You want to make sure you don't cover permanently something likely to need service, of course.
--
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I mean: Dewalt DW272
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I found that for a beginner(me) that a cordless drill and one a couple of the cheap dimple bits worked best. You may want to borrow or rent one for .5 day to see if you really like it before you buy one. The rented one had this adjustable doer on the end of it that set the depth of the screw and I could never get it set right.
Jimmie
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"Toe-nail" the butt edges, and on a two 48" board s- use 4 nails/screws each. Don't over do the fasterners.

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Ugh to the angling. Leaves a bad dimple, exposed screw head, or torn paper if the screw is too deep.
You have almost 2 inches. About an inch is more than enough real estate to screw in a screw.
In general it doesn't matter much if you install drywall vertically or horizontally. If you have 9 foot ceilings then obviously going with vertical 9' drywall is the way to go.
Otherwise, draw out your plan on paper 2 ways - first horizontal then vertical hanging. Add up the total of tapered joing footage and butt joint footage for each way. Choose the way that has the lowest footage of butt joint.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Just stagger the screws a little at the joints. 3/4 inch or so will keep them from bumping heads. Best to not have side-by-side screws in the stud anyway. -- aem sends...
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What many don't understand is that the first stud is a "zero" point. So, hook your tape at the corner, measure to 16", and back up 3/4". (Half the thickness of the stud). The second stud is always 15-1/4" from the out side corner, edge to edge. Once the second stud is marked, then it's simply a matter of spacing 16" edge to edge. That is, using the SAME edge, left to left, or right to right.
--
Steve M

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In layout of studs, the 'line' is the edge of the stud, not the centerline and an X is placed to the side of the line on which the stud is to be placed.
A tip that I wish I had known when I built: Take pictures, lots of pictures of the framing before you close it in. One thinks, "I'll always remember how the wall was framed"...No you won't and comes time to hang a shelf etc. it is nice to have a picture to see where the stud spacing began (which corner), or where wires run, or where that plumbing is.
Harry K
Harry K
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