drywall mud recipe

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wrote:

Let us know the final results and your experience. Many posters never come back and follow up. It is appreciated to know how things work out.
BTW, I would paint with white/light paint for a garage. SWMBO wanted one garage painted, she picked "banana yellow". Just a change in the color brought out all the imperfections in the finished drywall. White paint will show fewer flaws in the finish. Hey, she painted it :-\
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I agree...Ben Moore High Hide Flat white or any light color works wonders...LOL..I did a quicky CHEAP 2 coats of mud , no sanding on a garage ceiling (fire requirement for living space above) and it looked pretty good with that paint...I was pleasantly surprised as was my friend...LOL...
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I am, BUT, Google "joint compound plaster":
http://www.askthebuilder.com/DrywallPlaster.shtml
Plastering is also an "act" but if the OP looks at HD he should ask for a "taping knife". If he tells them he "dry-walling" they will know what he's talking about. (I just did it. I had to buy a new knife)
I'm sure plaster comes in many forms. You can go to any online dictionary and see definitions of plaster. Hey!...You even said you were nit-picking. I did a Google image search and came up with all sorts of plastering knifes but the "taping knife" appears to be more correct where the 14" is concerned. But what did they call them before drywall?
I asked for a plastering knife at HD and they asked me what I was doing. If they were laughing I couldn't tell. :) I don't care anyway. It's not uncommon for a tool to have different names and it's a silly thing to waste time talking about.
Jim
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I just didn't want to confuse the OP...Nuff said...Before drywall there was plaster with wood fiber or going way back horse/animal hair plaster...And paneling in the 60's and 70's with shag carpet...LOL...
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Sorry, a taping knife is NEVER used with plaster. Plastering is done with a hard steel trowel similar to a concrete trowel and the plaster is maneuvered on a plasterer's hawk.
There are some drywall finishers who do use a special concrete type trowel that has a slight arc designed into it, especially on butt joints. This, again, requires a hawk.
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That's about the right amount.
I thin a 5g bucket with about 2 inches of water from a medium soft drink cup.
Mud is pretty cheap, but adding water is a lot easier than getting it out. -----
- gpsman
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Do you have a paddle mixer and a VARIABLE speed 1/2 inch drill to mix it...If so add water to about 1/2 inch of the rim of the bucket...Start mixing SLOWLY or you will throw mud and water everywhere and bring it up to full speed and mix about 2-3 minutes..For the finale skim coat I add a little more water and remix or remove some mud in a new bucket to make room..Just toss it back in after you use some of it up and spin it again..
If you don't have a power mixer you can mix it in your mud pan unless like me you use a haulk in which case use an empty bucket or or watever you have handy to mix it by hand..Start with a little water and add more till it is as thin as you want it...
Adding water does not add drying time but it does shrink a bit more..Using it straight out of the bucket is a PITA , full of air bubbles , hard to level or smooth out and hard on the hands and arm as it is very stiff...HTH...
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wrote:

I've only met one person that spent his career as a drywall finisher. He was collecting SS and working side jobs when called for.
Working a knife and compound for say, 30 years was hard on him. He wore an arm/wrist brace so he could still work. Amazing finish work that crew could do.
Oh, he walked beside my ladder one day after I drove a long screw in a door frame. Lowering this beast of a drill, he was hit in the head. I apologized and asked him not to walk by when I have the drill in my hand.
He carried a large lump on his head for a few days :-\
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They're asking about mixing mud. What in the world would make you believe they already have the tools to do so?
LMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!! A paddle mixer, and they don't know how to mix mud. LMAO!!!!!! GOOD ONE!
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Around here, they sell several different types of compound in the 5 gal bucket.
Your first coat should be the harder type, it say "all purpose". It dries hard, does not sand easy. The second/third coats are applied using a "topping compound".
You can work out of the mud pan, to check your consistency. Note how much compound you put in the pan, add measurable amounts of water, little by little. Find or purchase one of those $7.00 electric mixers for cake mixes etc. Add the water, mix with the mixer, check consistency adding water as needed & mix further. No need to add water to the entire bucket unless you have a 1/2" drill with a mixing paddle. Those tools are too expensive to purchase for a one time use. Besides, you may add too much water to the 5 gal bucket, unless you've done it b/4. I've done the dry compound, various 30-60-90 minutes setting types, working out of a pan. If you happen to use setting type, you want to clean your mixer thingies b/4 you start mudding. Otherwise, they will harden b/4 you get to them again. Use a mud knife while mixing, to push the mud down the side of the pan, so it will mix with water.
For instance, if doing a knock down texture, you use topping compound, mix in a full 2 liter bottle of water to 5 gal. Done, work out of the bucket with brush & knock down with wet taping knife.
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ROFLMAO...Stop it I can't take it any more..My sides hurt..ROFLMAO..
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wrote:

You talkin' 'bout the cake mixer?!
Never saw one on a job site, myself.
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Never saw anyone mixing 20 or 30 minute setting compound then. You may learn something when you do.
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wrote:

Never have and never will!
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Yea , me either ..I can't stop laughing...A cake mixer...ROFLMAO...The guy is an idiot..One step away from my kill file...LOL...
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wrote in message

Yeah, thousands of other idiots like me, who take advantage of this guy named Edison, instead of mixing by hand. I'd really like to see you mix setting compounds by hand. Oh wait, you're the guy who doesn't know WTF they're talking about, especially compounds. Silly me!!!
I'll bet you still swear by using a handsaw, instead of using power tools, electric, gas, or battery.
Wake up, I realize you did stuff by hand 50 years ago, it's time to at least step into the 60's!
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wrote in message

Yeah, like mixing in a pan by hand is better, like you suggested! LMAO!!!!!!!!

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wrote:

Mix your mud thoroughly, a mixer chucked in an electric drill works great unless you're mixing a small amount. With a very clean and dry metal teaspoon pick up as much drywall compound as possible. Turn it 90 degrees and start counting. When it drops at 3 seconds, it's just right for taping. If you add more water and stir, clean and dry the teaspoon again before you test. If you want to tecture a wall or stipple a ceiling make it thicker. The last drywall coat should be slightly thinner.
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------080900020705030102070604 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
On 3/31/2010 10:51 PM, Phisherman wrote:

I'll readily admit, I;m no pro, but one thing I've learned from a guy who is .. .. add a FEW drops of DAWN Liquid Dishwashing Detergent to the bucket of mud. It lowers surface tension, makes the compound more "creamy", and enhances the workability.
--------------080900020705030102070604 Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="Content-Type"> <title></title> </head> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#990000"> <br> <br> On 3/31/2010 10:51 PM, Phisherman wrote: <blockquote cite="mid: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com" type="cite"> <pre wrap="">On Wed, 31 Mar 2010 09:16:38 -0700 (PDT), rlz <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="mailto: snipped-for-privacy@ellzey.net">&lt; snipped-for-privacy@ellzey.net&gt;</a> wrote:
</pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">I recently put up drywall in my garage (two wall and ceiling). I started to do the taping and mudding part and I have a question about the consistency of the mud. The five gallon bucket of mud says to add water to get the correct consistency. Being that this is my first major drywall project, I'm not sure what consistency to look for. Does anyone have a recommendation for the amount of water to add to a five gallon bucket of mud? or how to gauge the correct consistency?
Robin </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap="">
Mix your mud thoroughly, a mixer chucked in an electric drill works great unless you're mixing a small amount. With a very clean and dry metal teaspoon pick up as much drywall compound as possible. Turn it 90 degrees and start counting. When it drops at 3 seconds, it's just right for taping. If you add more water and stir, clean and dry the teaspoon again before you test. If you want to tecture a wall or stipple a ceiling make it thicker. The last drywall coat should be slightly thinner. </pre> </blockquote> <br> I'll readily admit, I;m no pro, but one thing I've learned from a guy who is .. .. add a FEW drops of DAWN Liquid Dishwashing Detergent to the bucket of mud.&nbsp;&nbsp; It lowers surface tension, makes the compound more "creamy", and enhances the workability.<br> </body> </html>
--------------080900020705030102070604--
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wrote:
I recently put up drywall in my garage (two wall and ceiling). I started to do the taping and mudding part and I have a question about the consistency of the mud. The five gallon bucket of mud says to add water to get the correct consistency. Being that this is my first major drywall project, I'm not sure what consistency to look for. Does anyone have a recommendation for the amount of water to add to a five gallon bucket of mud? or how to gauge the correct consistency?
Robin
Mix your mud thoroughly, a mixer chucked in an electric drill works great unless you're mixing a small amount. With a very clean and dry metal teaspoon pick up as much drywall compound as possible. Turn it 90 degrees and start counting. When it drops at 3 seconds, it's just right for taping. If you add more water and stir, clean and dry the teaspoon again before you test. If you want to tecture a wall or stipple a ceiling make it thicker. The last drywall coat should be slightly thinner.
I'll readily admit, I;m no pro, but one thing I've learned from a guy who is .. .. add a FEW drops of DAWN Liquid Dishwashing Detergent to the bucket of mud. It lowers surface tension, makes the compound more "creamy", and enhances the workability.
Horse Hockey...All it does is make the room smell better and your eyes burn when you sand it...Old drywallers liked to use it to cover up the beer and pot oder on them when they came back from break and lunch...LOL...
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