Drywall Lift

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How well? Use one one time and you will refuse to do it anyother way after that.
Put panel on jack. Jack it up within a fraction of an inch. Adjust it Jack it tight
sit down and Have a coffee, read the paper or make love to your wife and the panel will still be there. Grab your step stool and procede to nail or screw at your liesure.
The commercial ones sit vertical. Set panel on it and rotate it horizontal and crank away. Should be no problem for one person with 12 footers.
They also work well for laying sheets horizontallyon teh walls - Same easy adjusting of the panel and no rush to "get a nail in over there fast before we lose it!"
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

> "Grab your step stool and procede to nail or screw at your liesure."
Wouldn't the nailing and screwing have been accomplished in the previous step with the wife?
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YOu don't know _my_ wife
Harry K
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Tony wrote:

You absolutely want to use a lift. No question about that. If you can get the sheets onto the cradle (~36 inches high) you won't _need_ any help hanging, but it's not worth abusing your back if you can get help.
Be sure you pull out the outriggers to support the ends of the sheetrock. You can see them extended in the top picture here: http://web.mac.com/mphcj5/Panellift/Standard.html
Make sure you're in control the winch handle before you release the brake or it'll come around and break your arm (or worse).
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Tony-
To answer your original question....a drywall lift will make hanging ceiling drywall a LOT easier.
We used a "beater" of a lift and it still made a HUGE difference.
The lift gets the sheet up to ceiling but drywall is so flexible that it doesnt go snug everywhere. We used a few "helping hands" jackable struts to set & hold the sheet snug to the joists until we installed a minimal number of screws.
The had those crappy "auto creeper" style wheels that didnt swivel or change postions well and were potentially damaging to the floor.
I still worked with another guy; he used his Senco drywall screw gun and I either nailed or used a drill/ driver.
All in all it made a bear of job fairly easy. The only heavy lifting was only getting the sheet on the lift. Positioning the sheet on the ceiling was a snap. The tedious / tiring part was putting in all the screws (6" o/c ...that's what the inspector wanted)
cheers Bob
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wrote:

You can rent a lift. Doing this alone would be a challenge, but it can be done with 9' 6.5" T poles. If you have a lift (or two helpers), get the larger sheets. Drywall is very heavy. I used 5/8" on the ceiling. Do some reading about drywall. I was surprised to learn that drywall has a "grain" and it is stronger lengthwise than crosswise--important when installing a ceiling.
You might also consider a drop ceiling. They install much faster with fewer steps/tools.
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