Drywall Joints Showing - Sometimes

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I recently remodeled a room that included hanging drywall. I used lightweight joint compound and did the normal things such as taping, applying compound, and sanding. I put on two coats of quality paint. The results looked good when it was dry. However when seen with side light you can see the textural differences in the joints between the sanded joint compound and the drywall. The sanded compound looked smooth while the drywall field looked rougher.
Although it is really no more than an annoyance how do you fix this? Is there a coating like Kilz that can blend the two different textures? What about a skim coat? Should I have used the lightweight joint compound originally - is the sanded surface of the lightweight too fine?
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You painted over joint compound and you painted over the paper of/on the drywall, i.e., 2 different surfaces, hence the 2 different texture results. The paper surface raised, a tad, when it was wet by the paint, causing the difference in appearance/result. It is recommended you compound over the whole of the drywall sheet, not just the taped edges, so that the whole surface, to be painted, is uniform in/of surface material. By applying compound over the whole of the drywall (minimum extra work), the painting results will be uniform. Otherwise, to avoid the difference/results you describe, you would need to apply at least 2 coats of primer. Applying the extra skin of drywall compound is easier and cheaper, than applying the extra primer.
Sonny
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Doesn't sound like minimum work to me.

I've seen loads of drywall jobs where the result was uniform and there was no skim coat, just conventional taping.

I don't see how in the world skim coating the entire wall is easier and cheaper than a second coat of primer.
I don't know exactly what went wrong in this case. One thought is that maybe the taped areas were sanded TOO smooth. I typically use a fine drywall screen as the last step and the joints are unnoticeable.
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On 8/13/2011 10:24 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

And sometimes it just pays to use good quality paint. We redid a number of rooms and had someone hang the drywall. They did not skim coat the entire sheet but did do a really nice job feathering the compound.
We primed (one coat) with a good quality Sherwin Williams PVA primer. A number of people saw the primer only version and remarked "what a nice paint job".

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Recommended by whom? You?

"Minimum extra work"? You've got to be kidding. Clearly, you've never actually done that.

What planet do you live on, where applying drywall compound is easier than applying paint?
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I do it all the time. No harder than rolling on a paint layer.
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GMT, snipped-for-privacy@example.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I'm on the same planet. Once I get the wall where I want it, the last coat gets thinned and applied [nearly squeegeed] with a 12" knife. It takes me [who only does drywall every few years] less time to apply than rolling primer, and cleanup is counted as zero because I already had those tools out. [I still prime before painting-- but I like the finish doing the whole wall gives me]
I learned 30 years ago it from a guy who used a 18-20" knife to do it. He'd go into a room in the morning, and when he emerged for lunch you'd think it had been primed. I'm happy to finish a room in 2 weeks.
Jim
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Sorry don't buy that for a minute. Been there, done that. And I know how long it takes to do a skim coat vs just rolling paint. The skim coating takes way longer. If it were as you claim, it would be standard practice to skim coat all drywall, but it's not. Not only does it take a hell of a lot longer to put the drywall compound on and even it out, but you also have to sand it, which is a PIA and more labor costs.
Note I'm not saying that skim coat will not give a better apperance. It will if done right. But it's always a substantial additional cost and IMO, the difference in appearance isn't worth it. If it was necessary and cost effective, you'd see all drywall done that way. In reality only a small percentage is.
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wrote:

No one has mentioned the use of special drywall mud that is extra easily sanded. I think that it is more porous and hence harder to hide than regular drywall mud. At this point, only more paint is likely to help. Remudding is too drastic.
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Sorry don't buy that for a minute. Been there, done that. And I know how long it takes to do a skim coat vs just rolling paint. The skim coating takes way longer. If it were as you claim, it would be standard practice to skim coat all drywall, but it's not. Not only does it take a hell of a lot longer to put the drywall compound on and even it out, but you also have to sand it, which is a PIA and more labor costs.
I only sand lightly to knock off bumps which is not a PIA. I thin the compound to a light cream consistancy and roll it on with a paint roller. Then scrape it back off with a wide trowel. Why not spend a few hours helping someone and learn how?
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wrote:

I've done similar on whole walls to make old walls with bad paint jobs look flat-new. First spackle and sand nail-holes and dings. Then knife the compound firmly all over the wall. Takes no skill at all. Looks mottled. A fast go-over with a mesh sander hardly raises any dust. There's "skim coating" and there's "skim coating." I'd guess that on new drywall you're basically filling the pores. But for new drywall if the OP primes and uses a roller with decent nap he won't see well-done joints.
--Vic
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wrote:

It's normal practice in the UK too. The joints here are covered with a loose weave tape called scrim. Just taping and painting is reserved for poor class work, offices and the like.
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Doug Miller wrote:

All real pros and the drywall mfrs - it's called "Level Five" finishing (google it).
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Perhaps you sanded the joint compound too smooth -- but I'm betting that the culprit is a *very* short nap on the roller cover you used to paint the wall, probably 1/4" or 3/16". When the roller nap is that short, any small differences in surface texture will show through several coats of paint. Try repainting one wall using a roller cover with a 3/8" or 1/2" nap and see if that helps; if it does, do the rest of the room.

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On Aug 13, 10:43am, snipped-for-privacy@example.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Another factor is the type of paint. Flat hides best. As you move up in sheen to satin, eggshell, semigloss, etc, the more it tends to show any imperfections.
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Good point.
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On 8/13/2011 9:11 AM, Edge wrote:

I tend to "over roll" the paint which gives the whole thing a slightly textured surface and hides things like that. Also use a longer nap roller to add to the texture.
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Edge wrote:

You need a drywall primer that specifically says it "equalizes porosity" - otherwise you have to skim coat everything.
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On 8/13/2011 8:11 AM, Edge wrote:

DRYWALL primer would have probably prevented this. Another coat of paint probably will cover it up.
--
Steve Barker
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Thanks guys for the sugguestions. I realize now that I should have used a drywall primer on the new drywall to even out the porosity and textural difference between the paper and the drywall compound. Now that I have two coats of paint on, is it too late to apply a coat of drywall primer and another coat of paint.? Or is it best to apply a skim coat? (I did see a Youtube video on Level 5 finishing that was very interesting.) I have a cathedral ceiling where it is most obviously showing the seams under certain lighting conditions. I don't think another coat of paint will cover it up.
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