Drywall Gun Technique

I bought a DeWalt drywall gun to fix some nail pops, and I can't seem to master the technique. The screwdriver head just starts to spin in the slot when the screw reaches depth, rather than disengaging the clutch. What am I doing wrong?
Thanks
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Which model is it?
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<<Which model is it?>>
A DeWalt DW257.
It has worked a few times, maybe 1 out of 10.
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From the Manual:
TO CHANGE BIT HOLDERS: 1. Pull forward on adjustment collar and remove from clutch housing. 2. Pull bit holder straight out with pliers if it is difficult to remove. 3. Push new bit holder into spindle until ball lock snaps in groove in bit holder shank. 4. Replace adjustment collar by snapping over retaining ring.
CHANGING BIT TIP 1. Pull forward on adjustment collar and remove it from clutch housing (see Figure 3). 2. Use pliers to remove worn bit and install new bit tip.
DEPTH ADJUSTMENT: Follow the graphic on the collar to increase or decrease the fastening depth. To seat the screw deeper in the workpiece, turn the adjustment collar to the right. To seat the screw higher in the workpiece, turn the adjustment collar to the left.
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You have to set the screw depth/clutch disengage point on the collar. Try various settings on a scrap to find the correct setting.
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<<You have to set the screw depth/clutch disengage point on the collar. Try various settings on a scrap to find the correct setting.>>
I have done so, but regardless of the setting, the clutch should disengage at *some* depth, right? Not just spin in the slot.
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You are screwing into a stud, yes? It won't work if you are not. Not enough torque.
If you are going into a stud, then I'd say the unit is defective.
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I meant to say, "not enough resistance" (not torque)
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<<You are screwing into a stud, yes? It won't work if you are not. Not enough torque. If you are going into a stud, then I'd say the unit is defective.>>
My stud finder says there's a stud back there. ;-) I wonder if the drywall could have pulled far enough away that the screw didn't find it?
The times that the machine worked I felt a sudden bite and tug into the wall, as if the screw suddenly found the stud.
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That's it. You're missing the stud. Try 1/2" over left or right.
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<<That's it. You're missing the stud. Try 1/2" over left or right>>
Thanks for your help.
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wrote:

Are you using 1" screws? Try 1 1/4". I've found that if the drywall is far enough from the stud, sometimes a 1" screw can't quite get a bite and just spins.
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<<Are you using 1" screws? Try 1 1/4". I've found that if the drywall is>>
No, I am using 1 1/4". I think the drywall is bowed out a bit, which is why it wasn't biting. Pushing on the wall seems to help.
Thanks.
On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 15:38:56 -0400, NickySantoro

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for drywall screws, the driver cannot stop (clutch) according to torque, because each driven screw will have a different amount of torque resistance. No two pieces of lumber alike, etc. At a constant amount of torque, some screws would set high, others low. The bit coming out of the screw is normal, and the only way to set the screw head at a constant depth, relative to the surrounding drywall surface.
Bill

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<<the driver cannot stop (clutch) according to torque, >>
I didn't think that was the way it worked. I assume that the shroud around the bit stops at the drywall, and when the bit extends past a certain point, the clutch disengages.
On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 21:55:56 GMT, "rider89"

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Doesnt it have an adjustment for torque.
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<<Doesnt it have an adjustment for torque.>>
Just the trigger.
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