Drywall glue


I need to fill in a drywall cut-out the size of a floor tile. The recessed toothbrush holder was more a nuisance than it was worth. The intent is to glue a couple of strips of scrap drywall as backing and then glue a piece of drywall the size of the cut-out, tape and mud to make a "invisiblke" patch. What is a good household glue to use for drywall on drywall? I don't want to start a tube of construction glue that comes out of a dispenser . I have contact cement and white glue handy. The Dollar Store has several other types of glue.
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Cut one or two 1x2's a few inches wider than the hole. Hold these on the back of the wallboard and hold them in position with wallboard screws. Be sure the heads are counter sunk a bit. Then put your patch piece in the hole and hold in place with a few screws into the 1x2s. Tape and mud. This is faster than a trip to HD to buy the adhesive, and cheaper.
PaPaPeng wrote:

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On Mon, 30 Oct 2006 17:13:38 -0500, Stubby

Drywall screws! Now why didn't I think of that. Thanks. Love this group.
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Stubby spake thus:

>

That'll work, but to me it's doing things the hard way.
What a guy would want to do in this case is to make a "dutchman": cut a piece of drywall about 4" bigger in both dimensions than the hole. Draw lines on the back of the piece which are a little smaller (about 1/8") than the hole is (that is, about 2" in from the edges). Score--but don't cut--along these lines. Peel the back paper and gypsum off from the section around the piece the size of the hole, leaving only the paper on the front.
Now you have a patch which you can just stick into the hole (that's why the lines should be drawn a little smaller than the hole). All you need to do now is "mud it in", using joing compound. Smear some on the back of the paper and the wall around the hole, push the dutchman in, smooth it down, mud over it, let dry, then sand.
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This gives the opposite problem - it's the easy way, but it doesn't work very well. It's not very strong, at least. If it never gets touched, that's fine. You certainly wouldn't want to attach anything to the wall there.
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jeffc spake thus:

True, but it's plenty strong otherwise, and it works extremely well; I've always found it to be an excellent solution. You can touch it with no prolems. I thought the OP just wanted to fill a hole in a wall, not attach anything.
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It works great for small repairs, and not for where the towel bar is going to anchor. :) Personally I use it as stated only on about 4" by 4" or smaller. Bigger than that I can fit some 1x2 bracing thru the hole. With that in place then put the patch on and screw it to the 1x2.
sdb
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PaPaPeng wrote:

Doesn't really matter what kind of glue you use...you're only sticking paper tp paper which is of course what the wallboard outer layer is made of. White glue is OK, but you really ought to keep a bottle of Titebond II or III around for household repairs like that to take advantage of the water resistance. If you're dealing with a bathroom repair use a setting type drywall mud too. Before you start make sure to have some simple clamps handy to keep things secure until they set. HTH
Joe
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I had to cut some holes for fishing wire, and this is what I did.
I used wood shims, latex caulk and drywall screws. The caulking as glue seems to work for me, and doesn't run like wood glue, and doen't stink like construction adheasive.
later,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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I know this does not directly answer your question, but I would suggest you use some strips of wood instead of drywall for the backing, and just secure them with drywall screws through the existing drywall surrounding the hole.
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