Drywall fasteners....screws or nails?

Are screws that much better than nails for attaching drywall? A DeWalt screwgun costs 70,80, 0r 100 bucks at home depot, and a drywall hammer costs around 18 or 27 bucks, depending on the model. If I use an adhesive in combination with rink shank nails, will that equate with the strength of coarse thread screws?
Thx
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I know I put a bunch of screws into my drywall. Using an electric screw driver is not much "wear and tear" on my muscles and arms.
If those were all nails and I had to hammer them in, I think my arm would have fallen off! The ceiling would have really done me in.
Also with screws, I can screw them in exactly to the point of holding the drywall without breaking the paper (usually). I don't think I could be so consistent with a hammer.
If I am doing something, I get the proper tools and do the job right. It costs money, but I don't need to re-do something because it was messed up...
"Doe John" wrote in message

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wrote:

I kind of figured that, but was double checking. Home Depot had a clearance sale on Mikita drywall screwguns for 60 bucks, but they were sold out. I guess the 70 dollar DeWalt will be in my shopping cart tomorrow morning. Also, I will eventually have to install new ceiling drywall panels after I get some plumbing fixed, so the screwgun should be the way to go.
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screwing is faster [ my clone will take it from here, im sure]
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I'm currently replacing drywall that was installed with nails and construction adhesive. Seems there were only enough nails to tack the sheetrock in place while the adhesive dried. 15 years later, the adhesive has sagged and all of the joints look like shiite...
I'm using plenty of screws on the current batch of sheetrock.
KB

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It is sometimes called a dimpler. It works well with any drill corded or cordless.

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On 23 Jun 2003 16:46:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Karen) wrote:

Do you get a cheap, quick self-esteem boost calling people trolls?
Black and Decker doesn't have a drywall screwgun at home depot. Sounds like you know a lot less about this subject than even I do. Congrats.
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Yeh? Get an adapter.
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I guess you are only allowed to shop at Home Depot? The point was a cheap screwgun would be better than an expensive hammer. I don't think he knows less if he understands that a screw holds better than a nail and doesn't have to double check.
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Do you get one from posting non sequiturs?

Or maybe from doing that?
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Why? for What? Now who in the hell are you talking at, you stupid fuck? Will you ever use any usenet accepted protocol, or will you always be just a webtv shit stain?
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I prefer screws. They pull the drywall to the studs tighter, install quickly, and won't pop out like nails.
As for the driver, I just use a simple "dimpler" attachment for my cordless drill. I think I paid something like $10 for it at the local hardware store. It's basically just a phillips driver bit with a clutch setup that disengages the screw when it reaches the proper depth. It works well, is cheap, and you can replace the driver bit when it breaks (they will eventually).
There are even a few times where I had to do a "one-handed" operation with the drill. Put the screw on the drill/driver (it's magnetic), then hold the drywall in place with one hand while I drive the screw with the other. This would be difficult to do with nails.
Anthony
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a mimimum of 4000 rpm for drywall gun , no, you missread, and drills work fine for projects
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Screws, for all the reasons already stated.
If you're doing a lot - a whole house for example - it may be worth making the investment in a real screwgun. I found the difference between a cordless drill (lower torque and better as a screwdriver, though for drywall not quite as critical as, say, for a deck) with the drywall bit and a real screwgun quite significant. Easier and faster to use the screwgun.
Renata

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To add to these wise words - if you do have a cordless drill with a 2 speed setting - always use the slower speed. The higher speed on even a 12v cordless is enough to run a 2" drywall screw through the board before you can pull it back. DAMHIKT! LOL!
Jim Mc Namara
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You don't have to buy a screwgun, and you don't need one, unless you're doing a whole lot of drywall, and in that case it would be worth the money so you wouldn't be asking. With a drywall bit on a cordless screwdriver, it also makes a small perfect dimple, unlike hammer dimples, which often damage the gypsum core.
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