Drywall bitterness


I hired a construction crew for a local homebuilder and not a real contractor to drywall a room. The drywall was installed horizontally and they butted a factory edge against a cut edge in several places, leaving a 1/8" protruding line the length of the room.
I do not want a heavy handed texture on the wall but a subtle one to match the rest of the house. Will any amount of mud fix this or do I need to rip it down and start over?
By the way, if anyone is contemplating doing your own drywall, if I had only known how sloppy the "pros" are I would have done it myself and it would have been perfect and far less expensive.
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crabshell wrote:

Horizontal application is the norm in many situations. I don't see anything in your message that in of itself would be a problem. Finishing the edges at issue should not be a problem for an experienced mudder.
I might suggest that since you hired a crew rather than a contractor, that made you the contractor and these issues were the responsibility of the contractor which was you. You should have specified the methods if you had any preferences.
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Joseph Meehan

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Yes horizontal is typical. sometimes there is a reason factory seams butt cut pieces and this is no big deal to a professional taper. can't really tell from here whether the hanger met the standard of the trade. 1/4" gaps are common, especially at the wall ceiling corner, though the tighter the fit, the better. a good taper can fix anything. it would have to be truly butchered before you would tear it down and rehang it. you do know what hot mud is?

not sure how you could have 1/8" protruding into the room. do you mean where a tapered seam buts a cut sheet? that doesn't leave an 1/8th protruding...the hollow of the tapered seam has to be filled with mud in any case. You will have to have a slight crown over the joint because the tape will be on the flat of the cut sheet instead of in the hollow of a tapered seam. this will have to be feathered back. If you don't understand the above paragraph, you are in over your head and ought to just hire a taper too.
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On Mon, 06 Nov 2006 12:18:39 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I hope you didn't pay for it all up front. I would have paid for half or 3/4 up front and the other half at completion ... unless it was unsatisfactory, at which time I would tell them to correct the mistake or not get paid the remainder. That kind of deal however would need to be made ahead of time, so that both parties knew the arrangement completely. I made the mistake of paying $11K for a roof job all up front. Not only did I have to push and push to get the job completed, I was unhappy with the finished work. I complained, but the contractor said it was good enough. I threatened to complain to the Better Business Bureau. He said go ahead.
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wrotF:

Live and learn. This is all new to me. In the semi-final analysis, the framer is really the one that let me down -- who didn't address a mistake made when the house was first built in '59. The mistakes made at the beginning have become compounded. Now I know that the drywall guys just do their thing, and assume that the framework is as good as it's going to get the minute they start their job. Under a contractor that oversees everything, one would expect mistakes to be corrected before the next step in the process. My problem is related to the fact that I don't know exactly what constitutes adequate until it's too late. How would I know that the drywall guys couldn't add a shim or something to make the room square? So now I have to remove a few pieces of drywall, patch up the framing job, and re-hang it myself to get rid of this funky angle in the back corner of the room. Even then they didn't make 'em like they used to...
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Crabshell wrote:

Were at 'rock crew say to walk into a job and find everything perfectly square they would die of shock. There isn't such a thing and never was. I had my kitchen cabinet installer (new guy, first job) complain that the room wasn't square when he screwed up the counter top. Told him the facts of life. After two attempts he was fired by the contractor.
Harry K
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I'd git me mudder to do it.
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Don wrote: ..

B-a-d pun.
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Joseph Meehan

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crabshell wrote:

If you hired them to do an incomplete job, you have it and should be happy. It's incomplete.
If you hired them to do a complete job, it's not yet complete, you are not informed enough to know what you are looking at, and you should let them complete the job.
If it's not done to your satisfaction at the end of the job, when it is complete, then you can start criticizing the work.
I would suggest that you get more information before you start criticizing.
R
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crabshell wrote:

It's not clear from your post if that crew did, or is going to do, the taping. If it is not yet taped, it sounds like a normal application. If it has been taped and you have a 1/8" ridge, the tapers didn't know what they were doing. I had the same situation. Addition that required an 8' 4" ceiling height for matchup. 4' spliced in horizontally in the 'rock. You cannot notice the slight ridge after the taping.
If you are planning to tape it yourself, you need to learn about taping. Best way is a bit of reading in DIY manuals BUT actually watch a professional actually doing some taping before you try. 5 minutes of watching will teach you more than any amount of reading. the reading give you the 'what and why', watching will show you the 'how'.
Harry K
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The drywall crew and tape/mud guy are two different folks. I was concerned that the installation was not good enough for the taper to be able to hide the imperfections but is sounds like that's not the case -- at least in terms of the way the sheets butt up against each other. Thanks for your input.
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Ask the taper immediately before he starts work. Assuming he's basically qualified to do his job, he'll be able to tell you if the seams are gonna be okay. His opinion will be worth a lot more than all of the pontifications you'll get on Usenet.
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Don't expect perfection. If you start checking the finished job with squares, plumb bobs, levels, and straightedges you will be disappointed. Houses are not like precision machine tools and are not built to close tolerances. Some are better than others, of course.
Don Young
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Isn't that the truth Don.
My wife and I are building our own ICF house, and this is the first time for her to see anything like this to go from 0 to 100%. She's amazed at how when we started, we were always looking at the plans getting measurements and as we go further and further, the plans almost become less and less important. We've taken care to build things as square and plumb as possible...but this is wood and it moves...period.
Never sweat the small stuff...one can fix a lot with mud and a large knife and light touch.
DAC
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