Drywall 9' walls

Page 1 of 3  

Gonna be helping a friend build a new house after a complete burnout. His ceilings are going to be 9'. what is the standard procedure for drywalling 9' walls?
thanks
steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker wrote the following:

Same as for 8' high walls, but you have to get 10' high panels and cut 1' off them.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

Well normally 8' walls would be hung horizontally. Hate the thought of all those vertical tape joints.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Out in SoCal, I've seen 9' ceilings done with two 4' wide sheets (hung horizontally) and a "belly band" of about 1' between the two sheets.
I was surprised at this configuration since not all belly band edges would be tapered. But I guess ease of taping (more accessible height) was more imorptant than edge tapers?
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DD_BobK wrote:

thanks for the reply. I did do one wall this way in an older house we rehabbed. I had to tear out one plaster wall to replace a sewer stack and did exactly what you said here. It worked out well having the band in the middle. At least no bending over to work it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Any building materials supplier can provide 54 inch x 120 inch drywall if you wish to hang horizontally and avoid the belly band. Here at least, 54 inch board only comes in 12 footers.
Don't know if the box stores carry these or not.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ditto , that is the CORRECT way to do it...Go to any lumber or drywall place...NOT Home depot or Lowes...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, actually they sell 9 ft drywall board. I used it vertically in my basement
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

54" wide sheets hung horizontally.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe wrote:

NOW you're talking my game! I wasn't really sure if such a thing were available. Does it come in sheetrock brand?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Barker wrote:

All major manufacturers. May not be at the box store.
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, I wondered if anyone would point out that such are available. May need special order though.
Hanging sheets vertically is a tapers nightmare. I learned that the first time I did my own.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry K wrote:

I've been close to asking a similar question. my garage ceiling is about 9' 6" and was gong to ask about 10' drywall cut down and hung vertically. I would think the taping would be a breeze with all beveled seams instead of the butt joints? What am I missing?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't have any direct experience, but I think the idea is that while taping, it is much easier to walk along a horizontal joint than a vertical joint. For a 4' vertical butt joint, you can probably reach the whole joint from a single location, while for a 9'6" vertical joint, you'd have to move up and down a ladder repeatedly.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

1. Footage: Running horizontal results in about 1/3 less footage of seams. 2. Door/windows: It is a rare 12' wall that does not have an opening of some sort in it. Planning puts all, or almost all, butt joints above/below the openings 3. Taping a butt joint, even one that has one tapered and one cut edge, is not a big deal. Just do not use the mesh type tape on a flat joint. Very hard to cover without having a buildup. 4. Crawling up/down ladders or stools while trying to do a smooth job is not fun.
Learned that the hard way on my first job. You would have to hold a gun to my head before I would run vertical again.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No matter how carefully you tape a butt joint, you will end up with an unavoidable "bulge" in the wall. While this may or may not be visible to the eye, it would make the trim installation more difficult if placed over openings like that.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are solutions to avoiding a bulge at a drywall butt joint. Some of them are discussed here:
<http://forums.jlconline.com/forums/showthread.php?tB655 .
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Odd, I have a butt join over every window/door I have and had no trouble with trim. If you have a bulge big enough to cause trouble, you ain't a good taper. I for sure ain't much of a taper and I don't have a problem.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, I just try to avoid butt joints, so I'll take your word for it.
I think the point is there's nothing set in stone that drywall HAS to be hung horizontally or vertically. I've done it both ways, and still prefer vertical hanging for most installations. If horizontal works better for you, by all means go with that.
The pro's game is speed and efficiency. They wouldn't think twice about throwing up a 16' sheet horizontally to span a room and avoid an extra joint. They have the manpower, equipment, and probably a few tricks up their sleeve from years of experience.
The average DIY'er probably works alone, or with the help of one other person (i.e. The wife). It's easier to use smaller sheets and have a few extra joints to tape, than it is to wrestle a large sheet in place just to avoid a joint.
Home Centers are open after work, which means that's the typical supply source for most DIY projects. And, most folks don't have a way to transport sheets larger than 4x8 anyway. If the job is big enough, I'll have the sheetrock delivered, but that usually doesn't make sense for a small room that only needs a few sheets. Delivery is also not an option if there's no place to store the sheets, like my in-laws tiny cluttered house.
I've done a lot of drywall projects, but I'm still far from an expert. I just know what works for me.
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oops, forgot to add. Put no joint at the corners of the opening, they go in the middle of the space. Best of course is a sheet going right across the space but then you wind up with an extra 8' or 9' butt joint.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.