Drying dishes in a dishwasher

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True.
Not true (for most dishwashers). Most vent the heat into the kitchen anyway (during the dry cycle). Where else do you think it goes? Opening the door after the rinse cycle has completed and before the drying cycle has started simply vents the heat more rapidly. The total energy released is essentially the same either way.
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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Malcolm Hoar wrote:

I guess I did not make it clear. I was referring to using the dry cycle where the dishwasher turns on additional heat to speed the drying. Of course the residual heat in the washer would always end up in the kitchen. I assume some or all dishwashers do add additional heat during the dry cycle as mine did many years ago.
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wrote:

Not correct. Run my test.
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I agree.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

IT DOESN'T MATTER. Dishwashers vent the steam out the front anyway, with the door closed. The heat and moisture all wind up in the room anyway, regardless of whether the door is closed or open. The only difference is that with the door closed, the heat and moisture come out slowly, over a longer period of time -- versus all at once with the door open.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Terry wrote:

The heat accelerates the drying process, but the steam may inhibit it. So the most efficient solution may be to open the door immediately after the wash cycle completes to allow the steam to escape, then close it to to have the heat help dry the dishes.
As others have stated, conduct some experiments and post the results.
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I will just use the spatula wet if I need it before tomorrow. :)
I do like the tip to go ahead and use the dry cycle in the winter though.
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I really think we should discuss the merits and otherwise of wet spatulas before you commit to any rash actions like that!
These things are rarely as simple as they might first appear ;-)
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I do like the tip to go ahead and use the dry cycle in the winter though.
USing the the dry cycle in the winter only makes economic sense if electric heat is cheaper than furnace heat.
cheers Bob
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I think a lot of this depends on where you live. I live in a very dry area so extra humidity is welcome in the winter but it also means my dishes dry very fast without heat.
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 20:52:11 -0800, Bill snipped-for-privacy@no.address wrote:

True, they dry fast without extra heat.
But first part: You won't get extra humidity by using heat. You'll get the same, except maybe some water will have time to drip off and go down the drain** before it evaporates. You could consider attaching a humidifier to your furnace. You would feel warmer with the same temp, so you could use a lower temp and feel just as warm.
**How much water does the pump pump out. Is there what is basically a trap at the bottom of the dishwasher, or does the pump pump the bottom dry and rely on the trap below the sink. If the pipes at the bottom don't hold as much as they could after the water part of the whole cycle is over, then water dripping off would just sit in the pipes, where I suppose it would evaporate slowly, double slowly.
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BobK207 wrote:

Resistance heat is the most expensive unless it's free(windmill, hydro) on the premises.
Rob
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