Drying dishes in a dishwasher

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I have been told that the dry cycle of the dishwasher is the energy hog so I quit using it.
I was going to use something I had just washed in the dishwasher. When I opened the door it was still warm inside.
My question is will the dishes dry faster if I leave them inside with the door closed (while warm) or open the door and let the water evaporate?
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Leave the door closed.
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Typically, door open. And yes, skipping the heated drying cycle will normally save a significant amount of energy. However, it could be different for your dishwasher/kitchen so I'd suggest you conduct your own experiment versus believing everything you read on Usenet ;-)
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On Jan 25, 5:34 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

So far one open and one closed. :) Don't ya just love Usenet?
It reminds me of a thread I started once in a support group.
Can pets get hepatitis?
1) yes 2) no 3) not unless you are having rough sex with it.
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Of course that'll only work if you don't use AC. In the summer you'll heat the room with all that escaping heated water vapor and raise your cooling bill.
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Most dishwashers will vent the warm air into the kitchen anyway, although there are some exceptions including some Bosch models that vent the steam down the waste line. In most cases, I doubt the HVAC impact of door open .v. closed will be very significant. In any event, the original question was about which method would dry the dishes faster (not cheaper).
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Another Usenet myth. I have a Bosch dishwasher and it does not vent the moisture down the drain. How could it? The trap would stop all but fairly strong air pressure. Also, most dishwashers are tied into the drainline along with either the sink or garbage disposal ahead of the trap, and the moisture would just come up through that route.
Gary Player. |

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Some (not all) Bosch models have what they call "Condensation Drying".
I don't know how well it works in reality but it is most certainly a feature that Bosch advertise and their description of it seems reasonably sensible:
http://www.boschappliances.com/highlight . cfm?product_id75&htype=2#highlight_25
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I have a Bosch dishwasher and it utilizes this condensation drying technique; I'm pretty sure all Bosch dishwasher with stainless steel interiors work the same way.
Overall, it does the job quite well. Drying may take a little longer, but this isn't a problem if you run the dishwasher overnight. Sometimes a small amount of water can remain on various items, such as the bottom of plastic cups and bowls (the ones with outer rings) or on the recessed surfaces of plastic serving utensils. I don't honestly recall if this was a problem with my previous dishwasher (a Frigidaire Pro Gallery) or if it's something unique to Bosch.
The key advantages of this approach are as follows:
1) it's more energy efficient, since no additional energy is required to dry the dishes; 2) it's more sanitary in the sense that it doesn't draw room air through the dishwasher, which may in turn deposit dust and dirt on dishware; 3) it doesn't exhaust heat and moisture into the room which can add to your home's air conditioning load; moisture condenses on the interior surface of the dishwasher and is subsequently disposed down the drain; 4) it's quieter, in that it doesn't provide a direct path for sound to leak out; and, 5) it eliminates the heating element at the bottom of the tub, thereby increasing the amount of usable space inside the dishwasher.
Cheers, Paul
On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 01:41:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

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On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 02:42:01 GMT, Paul M. Eldridge

How does the water get heated for the wash cycle, without the heating element at the bottom?

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There's a "flow through" inline heater inside the equipment area.
Cheers, Paul
wrote:

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This is a very attractive feature, IMO. My next dishwasher will likely be a Bosch for this (and some other) reasons.
Over the years I've lost quite a few utensils and small plastic or wood items to the more conventional exposed heating element. It's annoying when it happens, the smell can be unpleasant and the risk of a more serious fire (although very small) worries me greatly as does the potential for one of my kids to stick their hands in there.
For me, eliminating the exposed element just seems like really good, thoughtful design.
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On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 01:41:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

"      Condensation Drying Unlike other drying systems that use unclean air from the kitchens back wall, Bosch uses the residual heat from the warm water inside its tub. A sanitizing temperature of 161F leaves residual heat in the tub, creating condensation along the cooler wall. The condensation is then drained so youll never have to release steam into the kitchen."
This sounds like puffing to me. Why would the walls be cooler than the steam? Alternatively, why would the walls be cooler than the walls of other dishwashers...Because their last water was higher than 161? How much higher might it be? Not much I think.
In answer to my own question in another post, it warms the water not with a heater in the bottom but with a "Flow-Through Water Heater In traditional heating elements, water falls randomly onto a coil, which warms it inefficiently and creates a hazard. By passing it through a heating chamber instead, Bosch allows the water to reach temperatures of up to 161F safely and quickly. This means you can place plastic items in the bottom rack without fear of melting or damage."
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I don't have a Bosch, but suppose they arrange for cool room air to flow around the outside of the stainless tub. That would keep the tub cool, and keep the dew point of the inside of the dishwasher at about room temperature. The dishes, still considerably hotter than room temperature, will evaporate water into this air more readily than what's usually inside a dishwasher (where the dew point is equal to the temperature of the dishes.
If this is correct, then the heat is dumped into the room, but the moisture is not (because it condenses into water inside the tub). The dishes are dried with the clean air inside the dishwasher, rather than fresh air drawn in from the kitchen. And there is no additional heater involved, so no danger of anything being melted by the extra heat.
But it would require a metal tub, not a plastic one, to use the tub as the heat exchanger.
    Dave
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On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 19:44:23 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cs.ubc.ca (Dave Martindale) wrote:

Possibly, but I have never seen a tub that wasn't insulated to cut down the noise.
In fact on my Maytag I added 2 layers of heavy rubber carpet underlay, draping it over the plastic tub (top,sides and rear) because it was noisy. My office is right behind the dish washer. It is whisper quiet now and retains much more heat. I know this because the counter above the dishwasher no longer gets warm with the dishwasher running.

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On Jan 25, 5:09 pm, snipped-for-privacy@malch.com (Malcolm Hoar) wrote:

In any event, the original question was about which method would dry the dishes faster (not cheaper).
good catch! everyone (including me) is discussing cheaper!
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 23:17:35 GMT, AZ Nomad

Do you think you will heat the room less if the water vapor is trapped in the dishwasher?
Let me think about this. hmmmm Actually, if the door is open and the water evaporates, it will actually cool the room, specifically the surface that the water was sitting on and the air nearby. Whenever water evaporates, it cools. And it raises the humidity.
But if you left the door shut after the cycle was over, the heat would still disperse in all directions, through the door, the metal top (and the counter above it), the metal back (and the wall behind it), the metal sides and bottom and cabinets and floor next to them. It would take a while and you couldn't sense it, but the AC would still have to remove the heat to reach the thermostat setting.
What about the water that cooled but didn't evaporate? It would still evaporate when you opened the dishwasher door, it would still cool** just as much, and it would still raise the humidity just as much, but it would have taken longer.
**I forget what it is called but it takes a lot of heat to turn water from a liquid to a gas, many times more than it does to raise the temp of water 1 degree. The water absorbs the heat from other things, making the other things cooler.
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latent heat of vaporization.
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That is asuming that you're working with cold to room-temperature water. Flip a shower all the way to hot and open the shower door and I can assure you that the bathroom will not be cooling down.
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On Fri, 26 Jan 2007 02:30:49 GMT, AZ Nomad

The first sentence in the previous post dealt with the heat of the water warming the room. Of course the hot water will warm the room, but it will do that whether the dishwasher door is shut or open. Just more slowly if it is shut, but the AC doesn't care if the heat is added slowly or quickly. It has to work just as hard to remove the heat.
So in sum total during that time you'll be heating the kitchen, but the evaporation of the water lessens the increase in temperature. Same for a hot shower.
(I know the water vapor is not trapped in the dishwasher but a) even IF for the sake of argument it were trapped, it would still heat the room the same amount as it cooled off, and b) if the door is shut, the water vapor's escape is slowed.)
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