dryer with no heat


I have had dryer problem before. That was an easy problem to solve. I removed the heating element and then measured the resistance. It turned out to be infinite. That means the heating element was burnt out. Replacing with a new one solved the problem.
This is a different dryer, a Maytag. Again, no heat. I measured the resistance. It was 12.5 ohm. At 240 volt, that translates to 4600 watt which is in the right ballpark (the label on the panel says 5600 watt).
I then measured the voltage on the two ends of the heating element. They are 120 volt.
Since there is electricity and the element is fine, why isn't it working? Any idea? Thanks.
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John Smith wrote:

120 volt will be only 1/4 power.
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First, check to see that you have 240 volts at the dryer terminals, or outlet. Once you've determined that, move on the diagnosing the dryer itself
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Very possible a thermal cut out did its job. If the vent is lint clogged, or some other reason the air flow is reduced, the thermal cut outs can get hot enough to "open". Look for oval metal flanges, round black device with two wires. Disconnect power, and pull one lead. Ohm out the two tabs, should be zero ohms. If it's infinate, buy a thermal cut out kit, probably comes with three cut outs. Replace all of them with the kit. Typically two on the drum, and one on the vent. And replace the vent tubing in case it's dusty.
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Thanks for the reply. There is a thermal cut out on the heating element housing. I checked its resistance. It is not zero, it is not infinite, it is 4.5 ohm. Strange. Could it be the culprit?
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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They just have to flow current. When they blow, they open up (infinite ohms). So, 4.5 ohms is considered good.
I have seen three cut outs on many dryers, please keep looking. Just finding one might not be all there are to find.
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Do these cut outs have two wires only? I found this thing near the outlet from the drum (beginning of the vent). It is open (infinite ohm). But it has five terminals and six wires (one terminal having two wires connected to it).
If it is a thermal cut off, I wonder how it could have been overheated. Surely that place cannot be as hot as the housing of the heating element.
Stormin Mormon wrote:

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RBM wrote:

Yes. It does have 240 volt.
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The next step is to test the terminal ends of the dryer element, at a point when it should be heating. You should be getting 240 volts across the element. 120 volts, measured to ground, means that one half of the circuit isn't getting to the element. Now you have to check all the limits and switches in series with the dead leg, to determine what part is "open"
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On some, the drum motor is 120 VAC. So, you can have one "leg" of the power disconnected, and not know it.
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wrote:

The safety over-temp switch has failed open???
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wrote:

That's fantastic. Not everyone can reach the infinite. Who is your Zen master?

Oh. :( But it was still infinite!

Absolutely, and resistance changes with temperature, but I forget which direction, so you might have more leeway.

120 two different places, from each end to the ground? In that case, what is the voltage between each other? Should be 240, right?
Or between each other? NOt sure how that could happen. But if so, check the voltage from each end to the ground. If you have two phase I think they should both be 120. If you have 3 phase, or 2 phases of a 3 phase electric system serving your area, they should both be a little lower than that.
YOu haven't plugged it in someplace else have you? I don't see how you could do that since the plugs are different, but heck I just spent 15 minutes hunting for smoething that was beeping. I'll believe anything now.

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