Dryer Vent Question

I just purchased an eight year old home that is in good shape.
My concern is that the dryer vent blows underneath my front steps, which are made of wood.
Could this be a fire hazard due to lint buildup?
I am seriously considering hiring a builder to re-vent the hose.
I went into the crawl space and it is neat and clean, no moisture.
Thoughts please.
Thanks.
Corinne
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In a word NO!
The exhaust from your dryer contains all of the moisture from your wash, do you want to dump this into your attic?
Dave
Paul Oman wrote:

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Clyde wrote:

The owner's manual will tell you the maximum allowable distance that you can run the vent. You may be over that limit either way - 90 bends creat much more drag on the air flow.
Having a too long vent run could be dangerous. The dryer won't be able to exhaust the heat as quickly and there is an increased danger of fire. Try and burn some lint some time - it burns beautifully.
There are inline vent fans to boost the air pressure in the duct and help exhaust the air. The fan blades are designed to prevent lint build-up, but they should be installed so you can access them to clean off the lint anyway.
R
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What about venting it into the crawlspace below? We don't have any insulation between the floor joists down there, and the ground is bare. The crawlspace is well ventilated (as is our drafty 50+ year old house).
I ask because to get the vent down and out through an outside wall will require about 3 90 degree bends along with about 40+ feet of ducting. My only other alternative is to vent through the roof which would be 2 90 bends and about 20' of ducting but I've read that it's not good to vent vertically because the lint will clog easier.

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wrote:

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Clyde,

You don't want to vent a dryer ANYWHERE inside the house, including the attic or the crawlspace. That's a lot of moisture that could cause rot, mold, etc. I also believe it's a code violation.

Unless your house is 80'x80' and the dryer sits right in the middle, I'm guessing you can find a shorter route to an outside wall. I believe the maximum length is supposed to be under 25 feet, which you have to subtract 5 feet for every 90 degree elbow (just going from memory on this).
I had a similar situation when I built my house. My initial options were 16 feet up to the roof, or about 20' out to a back wall. Once I stopped overthinking the situation, I ended up with a short 5' duct run to a side wall. I went down to the crawlspace, under the joists, then out through the rim joist in the crawlspace. Two 90's, two 45's, and about 4' of actual duct. I wrapped the whole thing with metal foil tape and insulation. It flows wonderfully and can be cleaned easily from outside.
Check your options further. You'll probably find another route that is much shorter...
Anthony
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Well, the dryer will be sitting in a bathroom which is just about dead middle in the house (which is appx 60' long and 40' wide). It will take two 90 degrees to get it pointed to the foundation for exit, not counting an additional 90 from the dryer to the proposed vent's hole in the wall. Closest foundation wall would be appx 15' from the vent's hole in the floor but that's right next to the front porch. Add another 3' for the duct from the wall hole to the floor, so min run is just at 19-20 feet.
According to the mfg's ducting chart, the max for 2 90's rigid 4" duct run is 16'.

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Once you get into the crawlspace, increase the duct to 6 inch, then run however far you need, within reason. Your flow resistance will be lower and you should have very little trouble.
Stretch
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sounds like the guy who owned my house before me

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Funny, I watched "Ask this Old House" Thursday night. A homeowner had an exhaust fan installed in their bathroom. The electrician claimed it was unnecessary to vent it to the outside, so he just installed the fan so it vented into the attic.
The homeowners ended up having water damage to their bedroom ceilings. It was winter when they went into the attic to see if they could find the problem, and they found sheets of ice on the inside of their roof.
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Corine, The temperatures from a dryer vent will not create a fire hazard. Neither is the lint a fire hazzard. Lint may burn, but it will not self ignite. If the porch crawlspace is enclosed, you may have a moisture buildup there, but I see no other problems, except the lint may be unsightly.
Stretch
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Corinne wrote:

can't see it as a fire hazzard but the moisture will contribute to your steps rotting out. instead of rerouting the vent try extending the ductwork(rigid) out the side of the steps.
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote: I talked with a builder today, and this is what he is considering, however, there is thick concrete to drill through first.
Thanks.
Corinne

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Corinne wrote:

No fire hazard, but it might increase moisture that could be a problem.

Good and you want to keep it that way so you DON'T want to vent the dryer there. Is there a way it can be easily vented directly outside (or is it now directly vented outside?)

--
Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

steps which are made of redwood, and there are spaces between the wood planks.
I spoke with a builder today, and he suggests drilling through the concrete and venting it outside.
I find it hard to believe that this is code, and that the home passed the building inspection upon completion.
Thanks.
Corinne
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