dryer vent location

I just moved into a house and had to buy a new washer/dryer. We have a main floor laundry. The electric dryer (Neptune) has the dryer exhaust connection coming straight out of the back in the middle of the dryer. The connection in my house happens to go down into the floor. That floor connection is right up tight to the wall. So the connection to the dryer is a 90 deg elbow, right from the dryer to the floor outlet. The problem is that because of the necessary radius of the elbow, the dryer has to sit 9-10 inches out from the wall. Wife is not happy. I went into the basement to see about possibly relocating the exhaust tinwork, but of course the spot where it goes up into the floor is above some unmovable return or supply ductwork for the hvac. The only thing I can come up with is something I've always tried to stay away from - flex hose. I did see some metal flex stuff at menards, and you can make a very tight 90 with it, but I wonder how bad that is for dryer performance. It would have this tight 90 out of the dryer, then go through the floor and 90 again, then go straight about 20 feet to the outside wall and the outlet vent. Any other helpful suggestions?
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John wrote:

Hi,
Seperate units, stacked unit??
Some seperate units can be vented through the base, which may or may not help.

A close wall elbow may help...
http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R 3&Nx 90 degree Close Wall Elbow Dryer Vent Duct - Standard, 90-degree, short radius elbow. Use for 90-degree turns within 4-1/2-inches of wall.
http://www.repairclinic.com/referral.asp?R 3&Nq Elongated 90 degree, Close Wall Elbow (Dryer Outlet) - Use where outlet vent on dryer is projecting outward. Snap-lock, rotating collar. Elbow turns 90 degrees within 4-1/2-inches of wall. Clamp required. Female to male connections (use on dryer outlet).

This is not as bad as the plastic flexable but not as good as the solid metal vent.
jeff. Appliance Repair Aid http://www.applianceaid.com /
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On Mon 13 Jun 2005 04:36:36a, Appliance Repair Aid wrote in alt.home.repair:

I've used 2 of this type in an installation with a 3 foot straight duct running between them. Never had a problem.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
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the one in the first link is fine, but the one in the second link is a fire hazard.
the whole point of correct dryer venting is no restrictions, and that second one temporarily cuts the pipe in half, which is a MAJOR restriction, and will collect lint and greatly increase back pressure etc.
I agree with the guy that said to get a new wife!
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wrote:

Instead of monkeying with a new dryer exhaust hookup, why don't you just get a new wife.
It worked for me.
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I got a new wife, but the old one left me the dryer, so I was no better off...
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main
The
is
9-10
I've
stuff
I bought the Neptune as well, with the stand. Stops me from having to bend so much after the surgery. Problem is that the outlet is now about 18" higher.
Two suggestions first cut the wall and move the vent inside re-drywall and tape. Paint would be optional for me. Second, and I attest that I have only seen this. Get some 4x18 square ducting, put end caps on both ends. and cut holes in the opposite sides of the large sides for the inlet and outlet. I saw this as a solution once. I would think that it would need to be cleaned periodically cause of all the fibers that the dryer puts out.
Best suggestion open up the wall and move the ducting. That is what I did.
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