Dryer Vent Hood Height On Wall?

I need to vent an electrical drier to an outside wall (it's in an attached garage). Is there any "standard" or minimum recommended height to put the vent through the wall (on the outside)? I talked with a handyman about doing this and I mentioned that I thought I heard somewhere it should be at least 12 inches off the ground. He said he never heard of that, and I believe he would want to put it quite low on the wall. Opinions?
Would there be a code for something like this?
-- John Ross
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John Ross wrote:

If you are in a snow area, you need to make sure it is high enough to be above the expected snow fall. That is likely were you got that 12 inch number. Personally I would consider 12 inch a good number to start with.
--
Joseph Meehan

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John,

I don't know if the vent height is regulated by code, but there are a few practical things to consider.
1. It's easier to route the vent through a wood wall than through concrete. If your garage sits on a foundation (not just a slab), the vent should be above the height of the concrete stemwall.
2. The vent should be high enough to keep "critters" like mice and squirrels out of the vent.
3. The vent should be high enough that winter snows won't block the vent. That height really depends on where you are located and how much snow you typically get.
4. Straighter is better. If the dryer sits up off the floor, a straight shot out the back would be best. If you have to angle the vent up or down, try to minimize the number of bends.
Your 12" height sounds fine to me unless one of the above applies.
Anthony
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I've heard numbers like 48" around here, but I have no idea if that is a code or not. We get a lot of snow at times. Mine is about 96", but that is as much about ease of a straight run.
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HerHusband wrote:

First, we don't get any snow, so that is not an issue.
Unfortunately, it gets a bit more complicated. The dryer is against the wall that goes into the house so a straight shot out the back is not possible. The external garage wall is at a right angle to the dryer--about 5 feet. But, it can't really go straight out to the side either because there is a water faucet in about that location on the outside (the whole side of the garage is clear except right there--all the luck!) There is also a hose storage thing hanging above the faucet. So to avoid that you have to go down the wall a few feet. But then there just happens to be a garage vent (open screen vent to outside near ground). It could go above that, but is that a good idea? Is it possible the lint could end up right back in the garage or getting caught in the wall vent screen?
-- John Ross
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John,
You may already be aware of this, but if you have not done so check the dryer's installation instructions and local codes.
If you are installing the dryer is in a garage it likely has to be on a platform at least 18" off the floor, and a garage location may be prohibited entirely by local codes, or may be subject to other restrictions or requirements - though a electric dryer dos not have an open flame it's still considered a "potential ignition source" for gasoline and other explosive fumes.
Michael Thomas Paragon Home Inspection, LLC Chicago, IL mdt@paragoninspectsDOTcom 847-475-5668
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John,

I would avoid venting near the faucet or the vent.
Could you go straight back (UNDER the house), then angle out to the outside wall as soon as you can find an available spot? If so, don't use a hard 90 degree turn. Go back a ways, turn 45 degrees, go a little further, and turn the final 45 degrees. The more gentle you can make the bends, the better.
Another possible option, straight up through the roof? I know many people do this, though it would require cleaning the duct behind the dryer every so often to remove lint that falls back down the duct. I wouldn't personally choose this option, but if nothing else seems to work...
Anthony
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12 inches is code in many areas.
If you can avoid 90 degree angles, that is best. I have been able to reroute many dryer vents using lesser angles, which helps the lint build up/cleaning process in the long run.
Alisa LeSueur Certified Dryer Exhaust Technician http://CleanYourOwnDryerVent.com /
John Ross wrote:

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