Dryer vent flap doesn't close automatically

Got some problem with my dryer vent.. help!! The flap doesn't close automatically after using the dryer. Mine looks exactly like this one:
https://www.ge.com/appliances/usa/imgs/acc011564.jpg
Here, East coast was -20c degree today when I walked into the basement I saw frosts on my dryer alumium pipe, I felt there was something wrong .So I went outside of the house and inspected the vent, and found that the flap was fully opened!! When I touched it with my hand, it closed as normal and I couldn't duplicated the problem.... not sure what when wrong. I am worrying about it will happen again.
Should I add some weight to the flap? say put a screw in it so that it won't open fully? will that work?? I can't replace the whole thing coz it's freezing out there.. any suggestions?
C.P.
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On Mon, 20 Dec 2004 01:08:05 -0500, "ChInKPoInt [No MCSD]"

Thats a common dryer vent.
Clean away all lint. spray the part that hinges with silicone lube (not caulk). Then flip it a bunch of times with your hand, and that should fix it. If not, it's bent and needs to be replaced. Yes, its cold outside, but replacement is pretty easy. Disconnect the pipe in the basement. Remove the 4 screws outside and pry it off the house. There's probably some caulk under it. Scrape away any excess old caulk. (so far you were outdoors for 5 minutes, ten at the most). Go in the house and pre caulk around the mounting flange on the new vent. Go back outside, stick it in th hole and replace the 4 screws. That's not hard, and you hardly had a chance to get cold. Then you got to replace the pipe in the heated basement. Just be sure to get one that is the same size, (both the pipe diameter and the screw holes).
PS. I'd avoid a latex caulk, it will freeze. Use silicone caulk or an oil based caulk.
Oh, if you do get confused out there and get too cold, stuff the hole with a scrap of insulation or even newspaper, while you warm up indoors. You really can do this job, It;s not hard !!!
Mark
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its a simple device, and gravity always works. take a good hard look at it. something is preventing it from closing. fix it. i suspect a couple drops of oil and a little lint removal would go a long way here.
adding weight to the flap may cause it not to open at all, potentially ruining the dryer or catching your house on fire. same with some bogus screw stop. dont muck with simplicity. just fix it.
randy

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I
and
won't
I've always had trouble with that type of flapper (I also live in a cold climate - colder than you, but I don't know if that's relevant - except that we really notice leakage from the dryer vent!). I was never able to cure it in the long run with weights and/or lubrication or other maintenance. It's just a flimsy design, and with the light weight aluminum they use, distortion is easy and any distortion messes up the function.
This fall I changed it to what I would call a "louvered" type - it has three or four plastic slats that flap shut rather than a single flap. Mine fits flush to the outside wall without a hood and is like this:
http://plumbing.aubuchonhardware.com/heating_duct/dryer_vents_and_hose/louvered_dryer_vent_hood-266574.asp
I think you can get them metal and/or with a hood as well, but this flush mounted plastic one of ours is perfectly fine and functional, much, much better than the single round flapper type. We haven't had nearly the air leakage and no sticking with this vent. You'll find them at any hardware or home store.
In trying to find a picture of this, I found this another kind, which you might want to check out. http://www.lib.niu.edu/ipo/ic020718.html
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