Dryer vent

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Hi Gang Can schedule 40 pvc pipe be used for a dryer vent? AND does anyone know of a dryer vent hood that actually CLOSES after the dryer goes off? Previous owner installed one without any kind of damper. No wonder cold air is pouring into the basement. Thanks, Chas
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I have a vent I got at menards I forgot the name but it closes with a 3" plastic pipe cap lowering when there is no airflow, it works well. It is large apx 9x7"x7"
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You surely haven't been to your local hardware store or you would know dryer vents have auto closers
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I have no idea why people reply to innocent questions in this manner. However, if you paid attention to my question you might have perceived that it was sparked by frustration with all of the cheap closers available that either get stuck in the open position, or never work as advertised. The fact is the previous owner is an engineer, and why he would have installed a non-closing vent is beyond my comprehesion.

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Engineers don't have any great knowledge outside of their specialty.
Unless the guy was familiar with building and construction, he wouldn't know what to do. Or the teenager working at the box store said "this will work", and he didn't know anybetter.
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One of my best clients is a former professor of mechanical engineering. Most of his house repairs look like Rube Goldberg stuff. It just reinforces my conviction that profs teach but don't necessarily do. I get to joke a lot with him. Y'know stuff like, "and of course that would follow from the 3rd law of thermodynamics" or "perhaps if we looked at this in a relativistic way" Richard
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Not *all* engineers are like this.
*grumble grumble dam stereotypes grumble grumble*
-Dave
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Chas12 wrote:

I've seen louvered type that will actually close, or a vynal type with flap the metal ones stop working after lint gets into the hinges.
tape the wall up and stick the end of the dryer vent hose end down into a 5 gallon bucket of water, put a brick on it to hold it down in there. free lint free heat
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I never heard of that one! Very interesting, but does the dryer have enough pressure to push the air thru the water? Also, won't that pump a LOT of humidity into the basement? Chas

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Chas12 wrote:

yes it will, humidity is not bad, especially during winter which is dry
you just have to imagine how much water is in a load of clothes. or...just look at a hot shower that's alot of humidity too
humidity can bring the temperature up, or at least make it feel warmer
if the dry-wall starts falling off, yeah, I'd say that's too much moisture
how much water is in a load of washed clothes? mmm, a quart and a 1/2? that's not bad...
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ITs not free heat, nor humidity,
Thats a waste of your time, and effort. Run the dryer vent like it should be, with metal duct and get a decent termination cap for it and be done with it. If you want humidity in the home, get a humidifier installed on your furnace. Its called RELATIVE humidity for a reason.
And while moister air will indeed hold more heat, using your dryer to get teh sometimes blast of it is wrong.
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CBHVAC wrote:

you goin be drying the clothes anyway, putting the heat outside!
what are you thinking!

not if your drying clothes
yure just acting like this cause you waste all the warm moist air.
just keep fooling yourself
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Why bring fumes of burnt Ng gas in the house, electric ok but at the cost of electricity , getting Ng is cheaper.
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true there! that would require a charcoal filter or something
Iiii just think it's too much heat to let outside.
I also think it should be worth the effort, meaning, if you have 2 loads of clothes a day, then I'd say it's justified to capture the heat. why not. but for the summer? I can't think of anything useful for the heat, i'd want that vented outside.
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OK gang, no more fighting! The new cap is installed and sealed. But now I found a bunch of air leaks near the foundation!! Chas
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Chas12 wrote:

now you wish you had that extra heat that you've successfully managed to pipe outside
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exactly.

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It is amazing to me how people who know nothing about HVAC have such strong opinions concerning goofy devices that affect the air in their houses. Yes, the dryer vent diverter will add heat to your house. It will also add a lot of moisture in a small space, which can cause problems, like mold. If you exhaust the dryer into a large room in a large house, probably OK. But there is no control on the dryer to detect when you get too much humidity in your house. You find out when the wallpaper starts peeling or the inside of the windows sweat.
If it is a gas dryer, you are also adding CO2. Some CO will also be added, which can be dangerous in concentrations over 5 PPM.
Unless you have instruments constantly measuring these things, qith alarms for high concentrations, I do not suggest doing it.
OP please note: PVC dryer exhaust duct violates codes in most areas. However in our area they allow it ONLY if it is burried in a concrete slab. The inspectors allow it but the code does not. (Inspector wins).
Stretch
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Thanks, I will stick with rigid sheet metal when I do it. Chas

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