dryer plug to two 120VAC 30A ?

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I have a 4 "prong" dryer plug in my basement. Is there a converter that will plug into it and let me plug in one or two 120VAC 30A plugs? If there isn't such a converter, how hard would it be to make one up? Thanks.
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On May 22, 7:47?pm, Reid Fleming

as far as i know ther are no 120 volt 30 amp receptables.
what are you planning on plugging in?
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Then I guess you're unfamiliar with the NEMA 5-30 .
FWIW, there's also a 120V 50A configuration, designated the 5-50.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hmmm, If it is on 120V, it'll be ~60A!
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just what would any homeowner use 120 volts 30 or 60 amps for?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

An RV as mentioned before.
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Steve Barker







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wrote:

There's NO 60A line there. You have 2 30A lines which cannot be connected together (this would produce a short circuit, actually making 0A available). To get 120V you use ONE how wire and neutral. It would be possible to connect two 30A appliances, but not a 60A one.
I have seen where someone was using a 240V receptacle for holiday lights.
It was an older house, so probably 3-wire. That was supposedly unsafe (current through a bare wire?) but probably not VERY unsafe.
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Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

No it won't.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On May 22, 7:47?pm, Reid Fleming

as far as i know ther are no 120 volt 30 amp receptables.
what are you planning on plugging in?
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On May 22, 7:47?pm, Reid Fleming

as far as i know ther are no 120 volt 30 amp receptables.
what are you planning on plugging in?
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wrote:

Most certainly is, L5-30's. Data centers use them and the majority of RV's use them as well. I have one on the outside wall of my garage for my camper. Option 5, 4th outlet down at this link. http://servertech.com/downloads/Technical%20Notes/notes_pt_cordconectoropts.pdf
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There's even a 120V 30A straight-blade configuration.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Get a four wire dryer cord set and the 30 amp 120 volt 3 wire cord body that you require and connect just one hot, the neutral, and the ground, leaving the fourth wire insulated

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No such animal exists. If you need a 120V outlet, jury-rigging one from a 240V plug is not the right way to do it. Why not replace the breaker and and plug thereby converting the line to 120V?
You could also just add new 120V line(s). You mentioned that this is located in a basement. Don't know your specific situation, but it should not be too tough to add a new line and outlet in a basement.
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Reid Fleming writes:

http://www.campingworld.com/browse/skus/index.cfm/Outdoor-and-RV-Accessories/50-Amp-Male-to-30-Amp-Female-Adapter/skunum $498
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On May 22, 6:47 pm, Reid Fleming

You could make an extended quad-receptacle box. 2 circuits at 120volts, each hot as feed and split neutral and ground to each. It should be changed at the breaker...but would work. Jury rigged, cobbled...Smoky Stovert style.
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On Wed, 23 May 2007 04:01:36 -0700, pheeh.zero wrote:

I took 240 from an old electric stove outlet and made two 120 strips for my workbench. That was 15 years ago.
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It will function fine in normal use. But the wiring and the outlets in your 120 V strips are likely designed to carry 15 A, while they are "protected" by a breaker that will carry 40 A. This isn't safe in an overload, unless you change the breaker to a two-pole 15 A one.
    Dave
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The breakers are designed to protect the wiring in the house, not the devices plugged into it. From that perspective, there would be no overload hazard created by this scheme.
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He's asking for 30 amp. you're not going to fit quad 30 amp anything in any standard box
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