dryer ducting and clamps

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hello,
i've been told numerous times by the dryer instructions, home depot, etc. to use clamps to hold the dryer ducting in place.
however, it is also recommended to use metal ducting (vs. plastic/foil ducting) to limit a potential fire hazard from lint.
how am i suppose to use clamps with something so rigid as the metal ducting????
should i just use tape instead to hold the metal ducting in place? is this a fire hazard too???
thank you.
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On 28 May 2004 07:14:20 -0700, kevin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Kevin) wrote:

I use metal tape for metal tubing. A pipe clamp should be used for flexible tubing or where using the metal tape is not practical. Do not use duct tape.
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On 28 May 2004 07:14:20 -0700, kevin snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Kevin) wrote:

A plumber hooked mine up after he hooked up the gas line. And he just used duct tape at the joints. I have the solid metal ducting.
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Kevin wrote:

Us metal duct tape. That is NOT the same as the cloth stuff, even if the cloth stuff that looks sort of like metal. You will find it in the heating and A/C section. It is more expensive, it has a backing that needs to be peeled off and it will work much better and much longer.
Also don't use flexible pipe.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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Use sheet metal screws and the proper tape, not cloth Duck tape
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m Ransley wrote:

Do not use sheet metal screws. The part of the screw inside forms a point for lint to start collecting.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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On Fri, 28 May 2004 19:40:54 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Hmmmmmmm, that's all I have ever used, and it worked fine. Of course there's always pop rivets, and they dont penetrate as much, but are harder to remove to clean the pipe. That's why I prefer screws, and just use short ones.
Of course there is always the other option. No ducting at all. I have never used ducting on my electric dryer. In the winter, that's free heat that would be blown outside. In the summer my wife hangs the clothes outside. A broom and dustpan is needed every month or so to clean up the lint behind the dryer, but that little chore is worth the free heat. WARNING: Do not vent into the house if you have a gas dryer !!!
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You must like "humidity"
R
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nasty. You can add a device that lets you redirect the filtered air back into the house during the dry winter months. Costs about $20.
Rudy wrote:

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NEVER use ANY screws on a dryer vent. Mastic, and metal tape...thats all.
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On Fri, 28 May 2004 13:33:04 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Why even bother with the tape. The screws are all that is needed, unless you are worried about the few minute particles of lint that might escape thru the cracks.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

You got it backwards. The SCREWS are NOT needed all that is needed is the proper TAPE.
Those who track such things UL, insurance companies and fire departments tell us that screws are a fire hazard. I follow their advice. They have no reason to make this up.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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(m Ransley)

You have never seen a year old dryer vent that some mis-informed person used screws on....obviously.
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Kevin wrote:

i put my dryer in and used straight sections of metal tubing from homedepot... i also used some metal hose clamps.. to hold the metal pipes... did not see any problem with doing it....it worked fine....
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First, plastic dryer vent duct is now illegal. On a gas dryer its always been. You can use a short section of metal duct, flex, designed for a dryer, but never over 14 feet. Anything over 14 feet is asking for it later.
The sections of KD, or knockdown, or as you might know them as, ridgid pipe, are held together with metal tape, and then covered with mastic for high heat applications. Never use a screw in it.
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CBhVAC:) wrote:

I agree that is it unsafe and a poor idea, but I was not aware that it was illegal. Do you know what authority (in the US) has outlawed it. I still see the stuff offered for sale as dryer vent and I would like to bring it to the attention of those selling it that it is illegal if I can verify it.
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bring
International Mechanical Code has outlawed it. It would be up to the local code enforcement to handle it.
The local Lowes, HD, and other big box stores, along with many of the smaller chains, have a notice back in their dryer section, around the ducting that clearly states that its been outlawed, and that it is also dangerous.
Local codes may vary, and you may, or may not be able to run the metal flex at all to the unit, but most will allow it here.

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Gas dryers get much hotter than electric ones. Be safe not sorry!!

bring
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International Residential Code 2000, Chapter 15, Exhaust Systems
M1501.1 General. Dryer exhaust systems shall be independent of all other systems, shall convey the moisture to the outdoors and shall terminate on the outside of the building. Exhaust duct terminations shall be in accordance with the dryer manufacturer's installation instructions. Screens shall not be installed at the duct termination. Exhaust ducts shall not be connected with sheet-metal screws or fastening means which extend into the duct. Exhaust ducts shall be equipped with a backdraft damper. Exhaust ducts shall be constructed of minimum 0.016 inch thick ( 0.406 mm) rigid metal ducts, having smooth interior surfaces with joints running in the direction of air flow. Flexible transition ducts used to connect the dryer to the exhaust duct system shall be limited to single lengths, not to exceed 8 feet (2,438 mm) in length and shall be listed and labeled in accordance with UL 2158A. Transition ducts shall not be concealed within construction.
M1501.3 Length limitation. The maximum length of a clothes dryer exhaust duct shall not exceed 25 feet from the dryer location to the wall or roof termination. the maximum length of the duct shall be reduced 2.5 feet for each 45 degree bend and 5 feet for each 90 degree bend. The maximum length of the exhaust duct does not include the transition duct.
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Tom Baker wrote:

What does UL 2158A have to say about the flexible duct an materials that may be used?

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Joseph E. Meehan

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