dry well cost?

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I just dug out a dry well for my washing machine. The hole was dug by hand approximately six feet deep and six feet round. I used 57 blocks with a 3 foot cover. I was wondering how much I saved by doing this myself. Thanks
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Sounds like fun but what is your time worth and where are you located? If you say NJ you are probably in violation of some code.
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Assuming of course you pulled the appropriate permits.
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My washer has just been dumping out under the mango and banana trees behind my garage for 20 years. The trees are doing great
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I hope you realize that there is solid material (lint, dirt, etc.) that gets pumped out of your washing machine. A septic tank, which is pumped out every so often would have been a better option.
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On 30 Sep 2005 12:01:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hmmm, dirt on the ground. Sounds like a super fund site to me. The lint and other organic matter is simply mulch that quickly decomposes.
I still don't see the ecological hazard I am creating.
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Dumping sewage into a dry well?
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

I'm not talking about ecology. Unless you have a way to remove the solid materials before they get to the the drywell (catch basin/settling tank) or after they accumulate in the drywell, you will eventually run into problems.
Also, depending on the location of the drywell, you might have problems with capacity during heavy rainfalls, regardless of solid material accumulation.
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On 30 Sep 2005 14:36:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Why a drywell? Just pump it out in the grass
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 16:25:03 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Where is the "sewage" in a washing machine?
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You were born toilet trained?
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 17:13:52 -0500, Richard J Kinch

You must really be old. I have not seen a washable diaper since the Johnson administration. You usually bleached the crap out of them so you wouldn't really have an E-coli problem anyway.
If I was really worried about that kind of thing I would be killing the wild animals who crap in my yard.
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They are still widely used by those who either believe they are cheaper or are environmentally desirable.
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 22:57:51 -0500, Richard J Kinch

I haven't met any of those people. I doubt many people have. If you are storing and handling shitty diapers, germs are not a big concern for you. I would assume an ecologist like this would appreciate the fertilizing effects of fecal matter. It is far more earth friendly than chemicals.
No babies here ... so it is not an issue.
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You are immortal and will never sell the house?
You're OK with your neighbors doing likewise?
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 23:14:57 -0500, Richard J Kinch

No problem at all with it. They are recycling water and that is a lot more important than worrying that one of the .001% of the parenmts who use cloth diapers would live next door. I still point out, if you have a dog, cat or endangered Gopher Tortise shitting in the yard you have many times the amount of fecal coliforms in a day than you wouild get from a month's diapers or a lifetime of skidmarks in your shorts.
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Now that you mention it, I DO recall seeing an old press photo of Robert MacNamara wearing cloth diapers at a cabinet meeting.
Dan
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On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 16:47:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't see an ecological hazard either. Looks like your posting host is in Naples, FL, at 6 feet deep I guess you are lucky you did not hit water since last I heard the average elevation of Florida was 2 feet -- but that's average and you must be higher.
As to all this code stuff, yea, be careful about putting lint and dirt into dirt. :-) Insofar as codes, I think a lot of it has to do with how much we want the government to micromanage our lives -- a government more interested in collecting fees and permit costs than anything of great "common good". Probably the worst pollutant you are putting out would be phosphates from the detergents.
I would SWAG that you saved about $300, but am sure that you easily could have paid well over a $1000 for the job depending on who you hired to do it and what they used.
Congratulations. Not only did you save some bucks but you have the satisfaction of knowing that you did it yourself.
(For years I have seen the "what is your time worth" arguments. I wonder if these people calculate how much it costs for them to sleep each night.)
FACE
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I don't think it is even legal to sell phosphate detergent in Florida. I know they usually say "phosphate free" on them.
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FACE wrote:

I think if you'll check, most detergeants are phosphate free now. In fact, I was told that phosphates were illegal in Florida laundry soap, but that might be wrong.
A
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