Driveway Paving Questions

Hello,
Live outside of Boston.
Have just started trying to learn about driveway re-paving, as my driveway is ready for a new re-do as it's pretty bad by now.
Know nothing about the various options, pros and cons, etc. Trying to learn prior to calling in some Contractors.
Saw this ad by one Contractor, and was a bit surprised to see that they make a big deal regarding "Hot Mix" asphalt.
Isn't ALL asphalt driveway paving done with a hot mix ? Are there other type of driveway asphalt paving I should be considering ?
Any help in understanding all of this, or comments on what they are talking about (I appended a bit below) would be most appreciated.

It is an engineered mixture of aggregate, or stones and sand, with liquid asphalt cement, a petroleum product. Varying sizes of aggregates are heated, then mixed, in exact proportions, with asphalt cement that has been liquified at about 300 degree's. While the Mixture is still hot, it is delivered to your driveway and paved on top of a base or subgrade that has already been prepared. Soon after paving, the mixture cools and hardens, you will then be able to drive on it in 3-4 days.
Would like to also ask one other item.
Have a dry well in the driveway. Made 35 yrs ago apparently with flat stones, built up into a cylindrical shape, maybe 4 feet deep, and with a heavy metal grate on top. Originally, was flush with the asphalt I imagine, but there has been a lot of degredation around the metal grate, and possibly a "bit" of sinking of the whole configuration.
Questions:
Isn't the ground around this system always likely going to be "mushy" and result in depressions and a small amount caving in ? The draining is apparently just around the opening of the stones; no pipe from it leading anywhere.
Should I just seal the whole thing over ? It does seem to help in heavy rains, though from keeping the garage dry.
Thoughts on ?
Much thanks, Bob
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For doing a complete driveway or road, hot mix is the only thing I've ever seen used. There is cold patch, which is the stuff you can buy at home centers that is used to fix holes.

After 35 years, you should know the answer to that by now. It sounds a bit strange. I'd say a lot depends on the material in the area around the drywell and under the asphalt. If it's good compacted base material the drywell will probably have minimal effect on it. Unless freezing occurs where you are and the drywell fills up, saturates the ground around it, then freezes, which will lead to the ashphalt failing. It would definitely not be my first choice of solutions. But since it has been there 35 years you should have experience with how it's held up.

Impossible to say without seeing it. First thought is that someone obviously put it there for a reason. You could try temporarily sealing it over in some fashion to see what happens. Is there any other way to channel or drain water away? Regrading the driveway properly before it's re-done?
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2011 05:40:24 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I'd DEFINITELY try to regrade so the water drains away from the garage naturally - dry-wells have their place - but generally not in the middle of a hard-topped driveway.
As for paving materials - HotMix is the best - but in some areas "Macadam" is used. This is otherwise known as "tar and chip" paving, or "mix in place"
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On Jul 15, 10:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

the baseis just or more important than the paving.
dig out and remove all old pavement, gravel and soft dirt......
then put in proper well drained well compacted base, roll smooth.
then apply pavement 2 inches of base asphalt one inch of finished asphalt well rolled and compacted.
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On 7/14/2011 8:06 AM, Bob wrote:

Dunno about the asphalt, but what you call a dry well, we call a catch basin. If somebody went to the trouble to put it in, you probably need it. It needs a concrete pad around it, to hold the top grate in position- asphalt moves around too much. Same paving companies you call for site survey and estimates should be able to address it. They may be able to regrade so it isn't needed, or cheaply replace with a modern precast concrete or plastic one. A catch basin/drywell usually does have an overflow pipe, if there is a convenient place to drain to, like the ditch by the road, the city storm sewer (where legal), or a daylight drain in a low spot away from the house. If it is to prevent garage flooding from a downward-sloping drive, modern common practice is a french drain across driveway, with a catch basin on one end.
None of this is rocket science, and a real paving company will be able to tell in a few minutes what is needed. Anybody starts scratching their head, throw them out.
--
aem sends...

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How far outside? I know a couple of reputable asphalt as well as one or two shady ones. These are in the Milford-Uxbridge area. Don't bother with the really big guys like Lynch as they are not interested in small jobs.

Yes, there are a few asphalt plants around and the stuff is heated when mixed and delivered. There is a course grade for the first layer and a finer grade for the top layer. Be sure your estimate states the thickness to be laid, usually two 2" layers.

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